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(function() {

    var content = [
        {
            title: 'My awesome blog post',   
            thumbnail: 'images/bane.jpg',
        },
        {
            title: 'My second awesome blog post',
            thumbnail: 'images/joker.jpg',
        },
    ],
        template = $.trim( $('#blogTemplate').html() ),
        frag = '';

    $.each( content, function( index, obj ) {  
        frag +=
            template.replace( /{{title}}/ig, obj.title )
                    .replace( /{{thumbnail}}/ig, obj.thumbnail );       
    });

    $('body').append(frag);

})();

Hello There,

I was just wondering why it is that the code block that is contained within a self invoking anonymous function cannot have the following variable declarations prefixed with the var keyword like so:

    var template = $.trim( $('#blogTemplate').html() ),
    var frag = '';

Adding the var keyword to the local variables in this function - template and frag seems to break my code and I really don't understand why, however if I declare template and frag on a global scope outside of the function as shown below then my code works.

var template;
var frag;

If this relates to scope and anyone has the time to explain it would be much appreciated. Ideally I would like to prefix template and frag with the var keyword to increase readability.

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1  
Do you use template / frag outside of the anonymous function? –  sroes Nov 22 '12 at 14:26
1  
just need to learn to syntax check your code. Have trailing commas in objects & arrays ( will break in IE) and can't separate 2 var with comma –  charlietfl Nov 22 '12 at 14:31
    
No I do not use template / frag outside of the anonymous function –  user1554264 Nov 22 '12 at 14:38
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I suspect it is the comma between the variable declarations that is breaking your code, and not the use of the var keyword per se. Try this:

var template = $.trim( $('#blogTemplate').html() ),
frag = '';

The var keyword is already applying to template and frag in the first snippet you have provided, because they are the second and third items in a comma separated list of local variable declarations.

function(){
    var x = 1, 
        y = 2, 
        z = 3;
    window.x; //undefined
    x; //1
    window.y;//undefined
    y; //2
}

The cleanest way to do this is to eschew the syntactic sugar altogether, and separate each variable declaration into a separate statement:

var content = [
    {
        title: 'My awesome blog post',   
        thumbnail: 'images/bane.jpg',
    },
    {
        title: 'My second awesome blog post',
        thumbnail: 'images/joker.jpg',
    }
];
var template = $.trim($('#blogTemplate').html());
var frag = '';
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, you should replace all the commas between the variable declarations with semicolons –  devnull69 Nov 22 '12 at 14:26
add comment

You don't need to prefix them with var:

var a, b, c;

Is already equivalent to:

var a;
var b;
var c;
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They're already local and have var in front of them - note the commas that make all the variables a single list of declarations and definitions, you just seem to not notice this because they're split along several lines:

var content = [ /* multi-line array */ ], template = $.trim( $('#blogTemplate').html() ), frag = '';

Naturally, adding more var inside list is bad syntax.

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