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I have a program depending on a large code base that prints a lot of irrelevant and annoying messages. I would like to clean them up a bit, but since their content is dynamically generated, I can't just grep for them.

Is there a way to place a hook on the print statement? (I use python 2.4, but I would be interested in results for any version). Is there another way to find from which "print" statement the output comes?

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The usual way to deal with this is to use a logging library –  Marcin Nov 22 '12 at 15:06

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

For CPython2.5 or older:

import sys
import inspect
import collections
_stdout = sys.stdout

Record = collections.namedtuple(
    'Record',
    'frame filename line_number function_name lines index')

class MyStream(object):
    def __init__(self, target):
        self.target = target
    def write(self, text):
        if text.strip():
            record = Record(*inspect.getouterframes(inspect.currentframe())[1])        
            self.target.write(
                '{f} {n}: '.format(f = record.filename, n = record.line_number))
        self.target.write(text)

sys.stdout = MyStream(sys.stdout)

def foo():
    print('Hi')

foo()

yields

/home/unutbu/pybin/test.py 20: Hi

For CPython2.6+ we can import the print function with

from __future__ import print_function

and then redirect it as we wish:

from __future__ import print_function
import sys
import inspect
import collections

Record = collections.namedtuple(
    'Record',
    'frame filename line_number function_name lines index')

def myprint(text):
    if text.strip():
        record = Record(*inspect.getouterframes(inspect.currentframe())[1])        
        sys.stdout.write('{f} {n}: '.format(f = record.filename, n = record.line_number))
    sys.stdout.write(text + '\n')

def foo():
    print('Hi')

print = myprint
foo()

Note that inspect.currentframe uses sys._getframe which is not part of all implementations of Python. So the solution above may only work for CPython.

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If I make from __future__ import print_function I cannot make any print 5 anymore. This breaks the existing code :-/ Any comment on this? Am I missing something? –  Alfe Nov 22 '12 at 16:26
    
@Alfe: The import statement makes print a function. (In Python2 print is a statement.) Like all functions, you need to surround the arguments with parentheses. So print 5 must be (re)written as print(5). Note that in Python3 print is a function by default, so for future-compatibility, it is a good habit to always use parentheses. –  unutbu Nov 22 '12 at 16:33
    
You started with "For CPython2.6+". I cannot change each and every print statement(!) in production code to use a function. If I could, I could just change it to call a myPrint() function which then could of course protocol from where it was called (raise exception, catch it, print trace or similar). The question was how to find print statements. –  Alfe Nov 22 '12 at 16:35
    
@Alfe: Then use the solution fo CPython 2.5 or older. :) –  unutbu Nov 22 '12 at 16:44

Strictly speaking, code base that you depend on, as in libraries, shouldn't contain any print statements. So, you should really just remove all of them.

Other than that, you can monkey-patch stdout: Adding a datetime stamp to Python print

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a very gross hack to make this work:

use your favorite text editor, use your search/find feature.

find all the print statements.

and input into each of them a number, or identifier manually. (or automatically if you do this what a script)

a script to do this would be simple, just have it look for for print with regex, and replace it with print ID, and then it will all be the same, but you will get numbers.

cheers.

edit

barring any strange formatting, the following code should do it for you.

note, this is just an example of a way you could do it. not really an answer.

import re

class inc():
    def __init__(self):
        self.x = 0

    def get(self):
        self.x += 1
        return self.x

def replacer(filename_in, filename_out):
    i = inc()
    out = open(filename_out, 'w')
    with open(filename_in) as f:
        for line in f:
            out.write("%s\n" % re.sub(r'print', 'print %d,' % i.get(), line))

i used an basic incrementer class in case you wanted to had some kind of more complex ID, instead of just having a counter.

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He did mention he tried to use grep, which kind of precludes this –  goncalopp Nov 22 '12 at 14:52
1  
in what way does it preclude my answer? if the print is always printing dynamic output, he can not grep that output to find where the print is. but if the print will print instead id, dynamic info then he can just find the id of the print. –  Inbar Rose Nov 22 '12 at 14:54
1  
I've re-read the question and you're right, my bad. I was reading the OP's as "the prints are dynamically generated" (not only their content). This suddenly makes that codebase look much more "boring" :) –  goncalopp Nov 22 '12 at 15:01

In harsh circumstances (output done in some weird binary libraries) you could also use strace -e write (and more options). If you do not read strace's output, the straced program waits until you do, so you can send it a signal and see where it dies.

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Here is a trick that Jeeeyul came up with for Java: Replace the output stream (i.e. sys.out) with something that notices when a line feed has been written.

If this flag is true, throw an exception when the next byte is being written. Catch the exception in the same place, walk up the stack trace until you find code that doesn't belong to your "debug stream writer".

Pseudocode:

class DebugPrintln:
    def __init__(self):
        self.wasLF = False

    def write(self, x):
        if self.wasLF:
            self.wasLF = False

            frames = traceback.extract_stack()
            ... find calling code and output it ...

        if x == '\n':
            self.wasLF = true

        super.write(x)
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I can't give you it but +10000 for that java hack! –  Jakob Bowyer Nov 22 '12 at 14:55
1  
Unlike in Java, you don't need to throw a fake exception to get the current stack trace, you can use traceback.extract_stack() instead. –  Lie Ryan Nov 22 '12 at 15:14
    
@LieRyan: Thanks, updated my answer. –  Aaron Digulla Nov 22 '12 at 16:41

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