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i use the EF5 and don't know why a entity has the state "modified" after i set the only changed PropertyValue of this entity back to the original value.

using (TestDbContext context = new TestDbContext())
        {
            string name = context.Person.First().Name;

            // count is 0
            int count = context.ChangeTracker.Entries().Count(e => e.State == EntityState.Modified);

            // Change Value
            context.Person.First().Name = "Test";

            // count is 1 
            count = context.ChangeTracker.Entries().Count(e => e.State == EntityState.Modified);

            // Revert Value
            context.Person.First().Name = name;


            context.ChangeTracker.DetectChanges();

            // count is 1 
            count = context.ChangeTracker.Entries().Count(e => e.State == EntityState.Modified);
        }

Why? :(

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Because Entity Framework only keeps track if the data got modified, not if it's different from it's original content.

We use a nifty method to reset the state to unmodified when the entity is unchanged:

    public static void CheckIfModified(EntityObject entity, ObjectContext context)
    {
        if (entity.EntityState == EntityState.Modified)
        {
            ObjectStateEntry state = context.ObjectStateManager.GetObjectStateEntry(entity);
            DbDataRecord orig = state.OriginalValues;
            CurrentValueRecord curr = state.CurrentValues;

            bool changed = false;
            for (int i = 0; i < orig.FieldCount && !changed; ++i)
            {
                object origValue = orig.GetValue(i);
                object curValue = curr.GetValue(i);
                if (!origValue.Equals(curValue) && (!(origValue is byte[]) || !((byte[])origValue).SequenceEqual((byte[])curValue)))
                {
                    changed = true;
                }
            }

            if (!changed)
            {
                state.ChangeState(EntityState.Unchanged);
            }
        }
    }

Please note that this method is for EF 4.0, not for the newer versions with DbContext. But it is no problem to rewrite it to use EF 4.1+, I have done this myself already but I can't find the code right now.

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1  
Once you have changed = true; you can break from the loop, to not waste cycles. –  cincura.net Nov 23 '12 at 6:02
    
Good point, thank you. :) I'll add that to our implementation. –  user1793714 Nov 23 '12 at 8:01
    
Little bit mysterious to put it into loop's condition. :) On a first sight I would miss it. –  cincura.net Nov 23 '12 at 8:05
    
Oh.. true.. I forgot that too. Probably still comes from my school time where they always told us: Break is evil! –  user1793714 Nov 23 '12 at 11:35
    
Break is evil? I hear that for the first time... –  cincura.net Nov 23 '12 at 13:12

Thx for the hint :)

here is my EF5 (DbContext) Solution. I call this method for every DbEnityEntry that i get from ChangeTracker.Entries()

    private void CheckIfDifferent(DbEntityEntry entry)
    {
        if (entry.State != EntityState.Modified) 
            return;

        if (entry.OriginalValues.PropertyNames.Any(propertyName => !entry.OriginalValues[propertyName].Equals(entry.CurrentValues[propertyName])))
            return;

       (this.dbContext as IObjectContextAdapter).ObjectContext.ObjectStateManager.GetObjectStateEntry(entry.Entity).ChangeState(EntityState.Unchanged);
    }
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Please note that your version is faulty. When comparing byte arrays (blobs, rowversion) you don't have to use the .Equals() method. Please check my version again. And if my answer helped you, you might mark it as an answer. :) Also use ((IObjectContextAdapter)this.dbContext) instead of your version. This will give you a minor speed optimization, but more important: It will throw a proper exception when dbContext is not an IObjectContextAdapter, instead of a NullReferenceException (unlikely, but I rather program defensive). –  user1793714 Nov 22 '12 at 15:51
    
@user1793714 thx :) –  user1481065 Nov 22 '12 at 17:09

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