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Hi i am stuck in setting a tag value of XML(Value may contain special characters) using shell script.

The XML tags values should be in double quotes.

Requirement : I have an xml with tags values.For the shell script i have to put a new XML tag with values before the tag . So am using the sed, i tried like below.This works fine if the $4 $5 doesnt have special characters .How to make this work with special character?(Ex :&><:".,;' etc)

sed '/<jobResulsDir/s/<jobResulsDir/<CommCellUser userName="'$4'" password="'$5'" >  <\/CommCellUser> '$test' <jobResulsDir  /' $temp_dir/PreImageModeFile.xml > $temp_dir/PreImageModeFile2.xml

Apart from sed is there any other way .Please help me

share|improve this question
    
Sorry i think the full sed command didnt pasted : sed '/<jobResulsDir/s/<jobResulsDir/<CommCellUser userName="'$4'" password="'$5'" > <\/CommCellUser> '$test' <jobResulsDir /' $temp_dir/PreImageModeFile.xml > $temp_dir/PreImageModeFile2.xml –  user1336309 Nov 22 '12 at 15:18
    
You have to tell SO it is code. –  choroba Nov 22 '12 at 15:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Awk doesn't care about "special characters". This in sed:

sed '/<jobResulsDir/s/<jobResulsDir/<CommCellUser userName="'$4'" password="'$5'" > <\/CommCellUser> '$test' <jobResulsDir /'

is this in awk:

awk -v userName="$4" -v password="$5" -v test="$test" '
   /<jobResulsDir/{ sub(/<jobResulsDir/, "<CommCellUser userName=" userName " password=" password " </CommCellUser> " test " <jobResulsDir ") }
   { print }
'

but you don't actually need to test for /<jobResulsDir/ up front since the sub() will only occur if the RE exists so you can abbreviate it to:

awk -v userName="$4" -v password="$5" -v test="$test" '
   { sub(/<jobResulsDir/, "<CommCellUser userName=" userName " password=" password " </CommCellUser> " test " <jobResulsDir "); print }
'

Not sure if this is what your comment/question was asking but if you need double quotes around the value names, just tweak the script to provide them where you need them:

awk -v userName="$4" -v password="$5" -v test="$test" '
   { sub(/<jobResulsDir/, "<CommCellUser userName=\"" userName "\" password=\"" password "\" </CommCellUser> \"" test "\" <jobResulsDir "); print }
'

and finally, here's one way you can split up the work to be more readable and more efficient if you like:

awk -v userName="$4" -v password="$5" -v test="$test" '
   BEGIN{
      q = "\""
      rep = \
         "<CommCellUser userName=" q userName q\
         " password="              q password q\
         " </CommCellUser> "       q test     q\
         " <jobResulsDir "
   }
   { sub(/<jobResulsDir/, rep); print }
'

And looking at it laid out that way i realize I lied a little about awk not caring about "special characters". sub() actually does cares about 1 "special character" and that's "&" in the replacement string since that's used to backreference what matched in the sub() so you'd need to replace "&"s with "\&"s in rep:

awk -v userName="$4" -v password="$5" -v test="$test" '
   BEGIN{
      q = "\""
      rep = \
         "<CommCellUser userName=" q userName q\
         " password="              q password q\
         " </CommCellUser> "       q test     q\
         " <jobResulsDir "
   }
   { gsub(/&/,"\\\\&",rep); sub(/<jobResulsDir/, rep); print }

It takes 4 "\"s because string literals get interpreted twice in awk (once when the script is interpreted and again when it's executed) so instead of \ to get a literal backslash you need \\.

There is an alternative approach using match() and substr() that doesn't have that constraint if you prefer:

awk -v userName="$4" -v password="$5" -v test="$test" '
   BEGIN{
      q = "\""
      rep = \
         "<CommCellUser userName=" q userName q\
         " password="              q password q\
         " </CommCellUser> "       q test     q\
         " <jobResulsDir "
   }
   match($0,/<jobResulsDir/) {
       $0 = substr($0,1,RSTART) rep substr($0,RSTART+RLENGTH)
   }
   { print }
'

Personally, I'd go with the match()/substr() approach as I hate messing around with escaping characters.

And just to cycle back round to where we started, here's how you could write that as a one-liner if you like:

awk -v userName="$4" -v password="$5" -v test="$test" '{
   print (match($0,/<jobResulsDir/) ? substr($0,1,RSTART) "<CommCellUser userName=\"" userName "\"password=\"" password "\" </CommCellUser> \"" test "\" <jobResulsDir " substr($0,RSTART+RLENGTH) : $0)
}'
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you its working fine :) :) . Even i am stuck in getting the same stetted value.Say the username and password are set now. If i have to read the xml file and get the values back which will be in double quotes how can i do that ?(values contains special characters) –  user1336309 Nov 22 '12 at 15:59
    
Sorry, I have no idea what you're asking. Please update your original posting to state your new question with some small sample input (including the output of the wget command) and expected output or even better post a new question since your original is now solved. –  Ed Morton Nov 22 '12 at 16:03
    
ok :) Thanks for the help –  user1336309 Nov 22 '12 at 16:06
    
I updated my answer in case you're just asking to put double quotes around all the variable's values. –  Ed Morton Nov 22 '12 at 16:07
    
One more issue is there with awk .If the $4 or $5 contains & then its replacing & with <jobResulsDir in the value. Lets say $4=ad& then its comming as userName=ad<jobResulsDir . –  user1336309 Nov 22 '12 at 16:22

Why not use perl? Does it have to be a shell script.

   #!/usr/bin/perl
   use XML::Simple;
   use Data::Dumper;
   open(my $XML_IN, '<', '/xml/file/path.xml');
   $/=undef;
   my $xml_ref = XMLIn(<$XML_IN>);
   print Dumper \$xml_ref;
   # ... access $xml_ref in appropriate location, adding element / value
   my $new_xml = XMLout($xml_ref);
   close $XML_IN;
   open(my $XML_OUT, '>', '/xml/file/path.xml');
   print $XML_OUT $new_xml;
   close $XML_OUT;
share|improve this answer
    
YES, i have to do with shell script –  user1336309 Nov 22 '12 at 15:42

What you are trying to do with sed will rip your brain out, you'll have to use a backslash before every special character to get it working. I use m4 for this kind of work. Watch an example:

define(your_macro_name,<Delete>
<Object fdn="SubNetwork=somemoredata`,SubNetwork=somedata'`,ManagedElement'=$1"/>
</Delete>)dnl

save the above code in a file named "xmlmacros.m4" Then create a file named "test.m4" and add the following contents:

include(xmlmacros.m4)dnl
your_macro_name(YOURXMLVALUE)

If the two files are in the same folder, you can run m4 test.m4 and your output will be:

 <Delete>
 <Object fdn="SubNetwork=somemoredata,SubNetwork=somedata,ManagedElement=YOURXMLVALUE"/>

where $1 will be replaced by the value in the parenthesis of the "test.m4" file. You can also add more definitions, to create xml files on demand, things like xml headers etc.

The above was a working example that you can use. You can look around for more info on m4, I always use it for this type of work.

share|improve this answer
    
I failed to paste things correctly too: In my given example, the command output will end with a closing XML tag: '</Delete>' –  Arribah Nov 22 '12 at 15:49

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