Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it implemented already, because this does not compile: (using gcc 4.7.2)

template <typename... Ts>
struct Foo {
    int foo() {
        return 0;
    }
};

template <>
struct Foo<int x, int y> {
    int foo() {
        return x * y;
    }
};

int main()
{
    Foo<2, 3> x;
    cout << x.foo() << endl; //should print 6
}
share|improve this question
    
If it does not compile, what is the compiler complaining about? –  Christian Rau Nov 22 '12 at 15:25
    
Variadic templates have long been implemented in gcc. If you want to check for feature support: gcc.gnu.org/projects/cxx0x.html –  phresnel Nov 22 '12 at 16:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You are making a few mistakes. The primary template expects types, not integral constants. You also try to instantiate the template with integral constants, but your partial specialization uses types.

This is closer:

#include <iostream>

template <int... Ts>
struct Foo {
    int foo() {
        return 0;
    }
};

template <>
struct Foo<3, 2> {
  const int x = 3;
  const int y = 2;

  int foo() {
    return x * y;
  }
};

int main()
{
    Foo<2, 3> x;
    std::cout << x.foo() << std::endl; //should print 6
}

But this is not really what we want, right? And it is also clumsy.

#include <iostream>

template<typename Acc, typename... Rest>
struct accum_help; // primary

template<typename Acc, typename F, typename... Rest>
struct accum_help<Acc, F, Rest...> {
  typedef typename accum_help<
    std::integral_constant<typename Acc::value_type, 
                           Acc::value * F::value>, Rest...
    >::type type;
};

template<typename Acc>
struct accum_help<Acc> {
  typedef Acc type;
};

// peek into the first argument to avoid summing empty sequences and
// get the right type
template<typename X, typename... Integrals>
struct accum {
  typedef typename accum_help<
    std::integral_constant<typename X::value_type, 1>, X, Integrals...
    >::type type;
};

int main()
{

  std::cout << accum< std::integral_constant<int, 2>, std::integral_constant<int, 3> >::type::value << std::endl; //should print 6
}

A simpler variant handling only int:

template <int...>
struct accum2_help;

template <int Acc, int X, int... Rest> 
struct accum2_help<Acc, X, Rest...> {
  static const int value = accum2_help< Acc * X, Rest...>::value;
};

template <int Acc>
struct accum2_help<Acc> {
  static const int value = Acc;
};

// again don't accept empty packs
template <int T, int... Ts>
struct accum2 {
  static const int value = accum2_help<1, T, Ts...>::value;
};
share|improve this answer
    
So how to do this: 1. Declare the <int,int> version of Foo and instantiate it with the constants <2, 3>? –  Cartesius00 Nov 22 '12 at 15:28
    
Foo<2, 3> x? Should it not be Foo<3, 2> x? –  Nawaz Nov 22 '12 at 15:35
    
@Martin If you want to be able to use Foo as Foo<2, 3>, then it looks like the primary template you want is something like template<int... I> struct Foo;. –  Luc Danton Nov 22 '12 at 15:35
1  
@martin I added a general accumulator that does multiplication. There are several levels of abstraction that you can still get out of this, but it shows the general theme. –  pmr Nov 22 '12 at 15:36
    
@pmr Thank you. –  Cartesius00 Nov 23 '12 at 7:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.