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The following testcode creates a server- and a clientsocket. Then client sends a message to server and server replies. Thats all. But I can't compile. All ASSERT_EQ in the threadfunctions raise the error "error: void value not ignored as it ought to be". I have no clue what this should tell me. What is the problem in here? Type is irrelevant as ASSERT_EQ(1, 1); raises the errors too.

EDIT Found this in FAQ from google:

Q:My compiler complains "void value not ignored as it ought to be." What does this mean?

A: You're probably using an ASSERT_XY() in a function that doesn't return void. ASSERT_XY() can only be used in void functions.

How shall I understand this?

void * serverfunc(void * ptr);  
void * clientfunc(void * ptr);    

TEST(netTest, insert)
{
  pthread_t mThreadID1, mThreadID2;
  ::pthread_create(&mThreadID1, nullptr, serverfunc, nullptr);
  ::sleep(1);
  ::pthread_create(&mThreadID1, nullptr, clientfunc, nullptr);
  ::pthread_join(mThreadID1, nullptr);
  ::pthread_join(mThreadID2, nullptr);        
}

void * serverfunc(void * ptr)
{
  net::ServerSocket serv(IPV4, TCP, 55555,5);
  net::ServerSocket * conn = serv.accept();
  net::Message msg;

  conn->recvmsg(&msg);

  ASSERT_EQ(msg.size(),5);
  ASSERT_EQ(msg[0],1);
  ASSERT_EQ(msg[1],2);
  ASSERT_EQ(msg[2],3);
  ASSERT_EQ(msg[3],4);
  ASSERT_EQ(msg[4],5);

  msg = {9,8,6};
  ASSERT_EQ(msg.size(),3);
  ASSERT_EQ(msg[0],9);
  ASSERT_EQ(msg[1],8);
  ASSERT_EQ(msg[2],6);

  conn->sendmsg(msg);

  ::sleep(1);

  delete conn;
  return 0;
}

void * clientfunc(void * ptr)
{
  net::ClientSocket clie(IPV4, TCP, "localhost",55555);
  net::Message msg;

  msg = {1,2,3,4,5};
  ASSERT_EQ(msg.size(),5);
  ASSERT_EQ(msg[0],1);
  ASSERT_EQ(msg[1],2);
  ASSERT_EQ(msg[2],3);
  ASSERT_EQ(msg[3],4);
  ASSERT_EQ(msg[4],5);

  clie.sendmsg(msg);

  clie.recvmsg(&msg);

  ASSERT_EQ(msg.size(),3);
  ASSERT_EQ(msg[0],9);
  ASSERT_EQ(msg[1],8);
  ASSERT_EQ(msg[2],6);

  return 0;
}
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you can use EXPECT_THAT instead, I think it outputs warnings rather than errors though –  paulm Dec 5 '13 at 13:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Q:My compiler complains "void value not ignored as it ought to be." What does this mean?

A: You're probably using an ASSERT_XY() in a function that doesn't return void. ASSERT_XY() can only be used in void functions.

How shall I understand this?

Your functions don't return void, they return void* - i.e. they return something (void* is a pointer-to-anything) while they should return nothing. The FAQ says it is required for the functions which use ASSERT_EQ() to have the void return type.

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It looks like the ASSERT_EQ can only be called in a function with the right return type (which appears to be void while yours return void *)

Personally I dislike macro over-use but that's the way it is. The issue with the macro is it obfuscates the code, so you can't see what it's doing wrong.

So just write such a function and get serverfunc and clientfunc to call it.

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this is not fully correct. I use ASSERT_EQ in other functions, too (which are called from the GTest unit tests) –  Philipp Nov 22 '12 at 16:45
2  
The limitation is that ASSERT_EQ must be in a function that returns void. –  Tyler McHenry Nov 22 '12 at 16:59
    
Thank you, @TylerMcHenry Interesting that they manage to make these testing tools for other languages that don't have macros, yet whenever they implement them for C++ it's always totally full of them. –  CashCow Nov 23 '12 at 11:05
    
There are two reasons for that. For one, C++ doesn't support reflection at all, so the only way for things like test fixtures to work generically is to use macros that take the name of the fixture and do token-pasting with it (e.g. TEST_F). The other is that, for Googletest in particular, it was developed for internal use at Google, and the Google C++ style guide disallows exceptions. So things like ASSERT_* have to be macros in order to insert a return statement into your test, which is really the only other way to abort it. –  Tyler McHenry Nov 28 '12 at 18:53
    
@TylerMcHenry I guess what you are saying is that the macros can stringify the text you input in case the line fails, as well as execute it, which is why it works well for unit tests. –  CashCow Nov 29 '12 at 9:26

As proposed, you should replace void* type for your method with void, and return 0 with return.

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I have the same problem, too, and I found an "ugly" way to solve it:

void* your_func(void* ptr)
{
    _your_func(ptr);
    reutrn NULL;
}

void _your_func(void* ptr)
{
    ...
    ASSERT_EQ(1, 1);
    ...
}
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