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In my htaccess i use this code for redirecting all non-www request to www except one directory where www is stripped and httpS if forced.

RewriteCond $1 !^example1
RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} !^www.example.com$ [NC] 
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ http://www.example.com/$1 [L,R=301]
RewriteCond %{HTTPS} =off [NC]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} ^/example1/(.*) [NC]
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ https://example.com/example1/%1 [R=301,L]

My problem is when i want to add more exceptions like example2. How do i do this?

Also if the exception directory is more then one level down like www.example.com/dir/example3 how do i do?

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Sure your current configuration works as expected? I'd say that exception does not catch. –  arkascha Nov 22 '12 at 16:34
    
Yes it works. If i try example.com it redirects to http:// www .example.com. And example.com/example1 redirects to httpS://example.com/example1 –  Tom B Nov 22 '12 at 17:17
    
Ah, ok, just now saw the first line... But that solution is a bit clumpsy, does not scale... –  arkascha Nov 22 '12 at 17:22
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1 Answer 1

Well, two alternatives:

  1. you have to specify a regex instead of a literal string and that regex must match all exceptions.

  2. you use rewrite maps. I suggest you take a look at the documentation.


Using a regex:

# some expections
RewriteCond %{HTTPS} =off [NC]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} ^/(example[0-9]+.*)$ [NC]
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ https://example.com/%1 [R=301,L]

# the default rule: => add "www."
RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} !^www.example.com$ [NC] 
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ http://www.example.com/$1 [L,R=301]

I turned things around, to have the exception(s) at the start and a 'catch all' default at the end. Obviously you can add more exceptions by doubling the first lines. Or by altering the regex. Note that obviously the details of the regex required depend on the collection of exceptions you have. Only you know... I suggest you read the excellent manual.


Instead of a more complex regex you can also use logical operators inside the block of conditions:

# some expections
RewriteCond %{HTTPS} =off [NC]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} ^/(example1.*)$ [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} ^/(example2.*)$ [NC]
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ https://example.com/%1 [R=301,L]

# the default rule: => add "www."
RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} !^www.example.com$ [NC] 
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ http://www.example.com/$1 [L,R=301]

Two important things that cannot be repeated often enough when talking about rewriting:

  1. READ THE MANUAL! It is excellent, comes with precise descriptions and good examples.

  2. If you have access to the main server configuration then USE REWRITE DEBUGGING: The rewriting module defines the two commands RewriteLog and RewriteLogLevel for this. Configure some log file and a level of maybe 7. Then make a single request and monitor the new entries in the logfile (using tail -f /path/to/logfile). This helps to understand what happens inside the rewrite engine and where unexpected things start to happen.

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This seems a bit to complicated for me, the example in my question i cut and pasted from other questions on this site. Please give me an example if possible. –  Tom B Nov 22 '12 at 17:20
    
Ok, I added a few basic examples. You will have to experiment a little yourself, since only you have your setup and know what you want to implement. But the examples should give you an idea about the logic behind it. –  arkascha Nov 22 '12 at 17:41
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