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I am wondering if there is no other way of passing arguments to another function like in the following example:

(function() {

   function a() {
      b( arguments ); // can this be written different so that I don't need arguments[0]
   }

   function b() {
      console.log( Array.prototype.join.call( arguments[0], ' ') );
   }

   a( '1', '2', '3' );
}());​
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Well... function parameters perhaps? –  I Hate Lazy Nov 22 '12 at 16:38
    
I thought about a solution, so that I can simply write arguments in b, but I think that's impossible. –  dec Nov 22 '12 at 16:42
    
Does b know which function is calling it? If so, and if you just want to eliminate arguments from a(), it can be done, but it's prohibited in strict mode. –  I Hate Lazy Nov 22 '12 at 16:44
    
I want to remove the indirection and don't know how to pass the arguments to b to accomplish that. –  dec Nov 22 '12 at 16:48
    
Are you thinking about a var shared between the two functions? –  dec Nov 22 '12 at 16:48
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2 Answers

If all you want is the arguments from a() to be passed to b() without b() needing to refer to them as a whole, then that's easy. Use .apply().

(function() {

   function a() {
      b.apply(this, arguments ); // call b, and pass on all the arguments
   }

   function b() {
        // now b() has whatever a() had
      console.log( Array.prototype.join.call( arguments, ' ') );
   }

   a( '1', '2', '3' );
}());​

If you simply wanted b to have access to the arguments of a without a knowing about it, that can be done too, but it's prohibited in strict mode, and it assumes that b knows it was called by a, so its really pretty ugly.

(function() {

   function a() {
      b(); // can this be written different so that I don't need arguments[0]
   }

   function b() {
      console.log( Array.prototype.join.call( a.arguments, ' ') );
   }

   a( '1', '2', '3' );
}());​

Again, this is not allowed in strict mode, and assumes quite a bit, so I really wouldn't recommend this.

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Pretty simple, thank you for your advice. –  dec Nov 23 '12 at 7:41
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You can define the function to accept arguments, like

function a(arg1, arg2) { // arg1 and arg2 can be any name you want.
    b(arg1);  // invoke b with arg1
}

but that only works if you know how many arguments there are, or if there are a reasonable amount.

Other than that, you are stuck using arguments.

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