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Actually in the center of current view, above all other objects. Cross-browser and without 3rd party plugins and etc.

Via CSS or Javascript

UPDATE:

I tried to use Javascript's Sys.UI.DomElement.setLocation() but this positioning object not in absolute location but relative to it's parent.
Is there a function to put in absolute location?

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To position relative to the browser window, use "fixed". –  ndp Aug 29 '09 at 22:21

7 Answers 7

up vote 19 down vote accepted

To have it center in the browser, regardless of the page scroll (which is probably what you want), position: fixed will be more reliable. Amending mike108's code:

<style type="text/css"> 
.centered {  
  position:fixed;
  z-index: 100;  
  top:50%;  
  left:50%;  
  margin:-100px 0 0 -100px;  
  width:200px;  
  height:200px;  
}  
</style>

This assumes you have a fixed size box you are showing. If you don't have a fixed size box, you'll need to use Javascript to measure the window and the div and position it explicitly (again, fixed is probably the way to go).

Do test on all your browsers, though. There may be something we're not thinking of.

I'd actually recommend you look at one of the Javascript plugins that does this, at least for a starting point. They have figured it out, even if you don't want to use their code. I think I used jqModal as a starting point.

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2  
But IE6 can not recognize position:fixed. –  Mike108 Aug 31 '09 at 11:16
<style type="text/css"> 
.Div1 {  
position:absolute;  
top:50%;  
left:50%;  
margin:-100px 0 0 -100px;  
width:200px;  
height:200px;  
border:1px solid #9999FF;  
}  
</style> 


<div class="Div1">
</div>
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Set z-index to place the div above all other objects –  Mike108 Aug 29 '09 at 16:16
    
It is horizontal center and vertical center. –  Mike108 Aug 29 '09 at 16:24
    
Do I set the margins according to width and height? –  dani Aug 29 '09 at 17:04
    
Because it doesn't have a fixed width... –  dani Aug 29 '09 at 17:08
    
Yes. If you don't have fixed width or height you have to use JS to get those numbers and adjust your position accordingly. At that point, though, you can just adjust left and top to reflect the proper offset and forget about margins entirely. –  Eric M Suzanne Aug 29 '09 at 17:36

It must have a width assigned ( i.e. width:500px;) and then margin:auto; should do it.

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Not in Internet Explorer :( –  Thinker Aug 29 '09 at 18:08

I'm using this block of js code;

// call function for both height and width center

    setToCenterOfParent( $('#myDiv'), document.body, false, false);

// call function for both height center only

    setToCenterOfParent( $('#myDiv'), document.body, false, true);

// call function for both width center only

    setToCenterOfParent( $('#myDiv'), document.body, true, false);

//function definition

    function setToCenterOfParent(element, parent, ignoreWidth, ignoreHeight){
        parentWidth = $(parent).width();
        parentHeight = $(parent).height();  
        elementWidth = $(element).width();
        elementHeight = $(element).height();
        if(!ignoreWidth)
            $(element).css('left', parentWidth/2 - elementWidth/2);
        if(!ignoreHeight)
            $(element).css('top', parentHeight/2 - elementHeight/2);
    }
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Please clarify in future that this is JQuery, not JS. The original poster did say no 3rd party requirements. –  Liam Dawson Jan 4 '14 at 11:39

If you want something vertically and horizontally centered, try this...

 #shell{
width:100%;
height:100%
position:absolute;
z-index:100;
background: rgba(255,255,255,.8);
display:table;
}

#inner{
 margin:0 auto;
 display:table-cell;
 vertically-align:middle;
 width: /* input width here */
}


  #overlay_container{
    width: /* input width here again */
    height: /* input height here */
    additional-styles: /* self explanatory */
    }
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Please check this solution. There is no need to define a width or a height of the div box. It will be always in the middle/centre of the screen. I hope my solution will be usefull for everyone.

<style type="text/css"> 

  .mask{
    position:fixed;
    z-index:100;
    width:100%;
    height:100%;
    text-align: center;
    color: white;
    background-color: rgba(0,0,0,0.75);
    overflow:hidden;
  }

  .contener{
    height:100%;
    display:inline-table;
  }

  .contener .content{
    vertical-align: middle;
    display:table-cell;
  }

  .contener .content p{
    padding:2em;    
    border:1px solid #3d3d3d;
    background-color: #1d1d1d;
    border-radius: 10px;
    -moz-box-shadow: 0px 10px 10px black;
    -webkit-box-shadow: 0px 10px 10px black;
    box-shadow: 0px 10px 10px black;
  }

</style> 

<div class="mask">  
   <div class="contener">
     <div class="content">
       <p>Test string</p>
     </div>
   </div>
</div>
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div#center {
    margin:auto;
    width:300px;
    height:300px;
    z-index:100;
}

That CSS code should do it. The margin:auto centers it, and the z-index:100 puts it to the top.

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It is horizontal center only, and is not horizontal center and vertical center. –  Mike108 Aug 29 '09 at 16:22
    
Can you be more specific about the z-index: 100; ? The z-index doesn't put it to the top, it put it to the top of the z axis. –  LukyVj Apr 21 at 15:14

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