Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got some large data.frames with POSIXct columns.

                 time longitude latitude
1 2012-10-28 23:01:00  16.42125 52.37832
2 2012-10-28 23:02:00  16.42125 52.37832
3 2012-10-28 23:03:00  16.42127 52.37832
...

For compatibility reasons, I store the time values instead of the row indices in some places. How can I obtain the (always consecutive) rows with those time values?

With indices, I'd do this:

indices <- 1:3
rows <- dat[indices,]

But with time:

times <- dat$time[1:3]
rows <- ???

What's an efficient solution?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Switch to package xts. Here us a random example for you:

R> dat <- xts(as.matrix(data.frame(long=rnorm(20, 16, 0.1), 
+                                  lat=rnorm(20, 52, 0.1))),
+             order.by=ISOdatetime(2012,10,28,23,00,00)+seq(1,20))
R> dat
                       long     lat
2012-10-28 23:00:01 16.1100 52.0176
2012-10-28 23:00:02 15.7947 52.1227
2012-10-28 23:00:03 15.9632 52.1097
2012-10-28 23:00:04 16.1478 51.8562
2012-10-28 23:00:05 16.0800 52.0969
2012-10-28 23:00:06 15.9444 51.9217
2012-10-28 23:00:07 16.1291 52.1710
2012-10-28 23:00:08 16.1400 52.0243
2012-10-28 23:00:09 15.8718 52.0717
2012-10-28 23:00:10 16.0093 51.9953
2012-10-28 23:00:11 15.9821 52.1891
2012-10-28 23:00:12 16.0326 51.9598
2012-10-28 23:00:13 15.9243 51.9634
2012-10-28 23:00:14 15.9498 52.1015
2012-10-28 23:00:15 16.1454 51.9398
2012-10-28 23:00:16 15.9191 51.8936
2012-10-28 23:00:17 16.0541 51.7999
2012-10-28 23:00:18 15.7676 52.0641
2012-10-28 23:00:19 16.1154 52.0178
2012-10-28 23:00:20 16.1094 51.9573
R>

You can easily create xts objects from existing ones, read from file, etc pp. Lots of examples here too.

Now you can use the nice subsetting:

R> dat["2012-10-28 23:00:10/2012-10-28 23:00:14"]
                       long     lat
2012-10-28 23:00:10 16.0093 51.9953
2012-10-28 23:00:11 15.9821 52.1891
2012-10-28 23:00:12 16.0326 51.9598
2012-10-28 23:00:13 15.9243 51.9634
2012-10-28 23:00:14 15.9498 52.1015
R> 

or even in shorthand:

R> dat["T23:00:10/T23:00:14"]
                       long     lat
2012-10-28 23:00:10 16.0093 51.9953
2012-10-28 23:00:11 15.9821 52.1891
2012-10-28 23:00:12 16.0326 51.9598
2012-10-28 23:00:13 15.9243 51.9634
2012-10-28 23:00:14 15.9498 52.1015
R> 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for bringing this very useful package to my attention! I've stored the start- and end-points as POSIXct values; how can I use that for defining the subset? To create the "2012-10-28 23:00:10/2012-10-28 23:00:14" string with strftime seems unnecessary. –  Andreas Nov 23 '12 at 0:44
    
or dat[ paste(start_t,"/",last_t,sep="") ] –  Andreas Nov 23 '12 at 0:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.