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I am currently working on a little toy program with OpenGL which shows a scene in clip-space view, i.e. it draws a cube to visualize the canonical view volume and inside the cube, the projectively transformed model is drawn. To show a code snippet for the model drawing:

glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);
glLoadIdentity();
glScalef(1.0f, 1.0f, -1.0f);
glMultMatrixd(projectionMat);
glMultMatrixd(modelviewMat);
glEnable(GL_LIGHTING);
draw_model();
glDisable(GL_LIGHTING);

So, naturally, the drawn model is "distorted" (which is the desired behaviour). However, the lighting is wrong, as the surface normals are also transformed by the projection matrix and, thus, are not orthogonal to their surfaces after transform. What I am trying to accomplish is lighting that is "correct" in the sense that the surfaces of the distorted models have correct normals.

The question is - how can I do that? I was playing with the usual transposed-inverse-matrix rule for normals, but as far as I understand, that's what OGL does with its normals by default. I think I would have to recalculate the surface normals AFTER the surfaces are transformed with the modelview matrix, but how to do that? Or is there another way?

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Are you trying to do something like this? My tutorial there explains how to do it, but it's in terms of shader-based logic. It's all still just matrix math, and it even uses a matrix stack, so you should be able to translate it. –  Nicol Bolas Nov 22 '12 at 19:04
    
Actually, "double projection" is exactly what I am trying to do, yes :) As you describe in your tutorial, the point is to see the "weird" shape of objects in normalized device coordinates. However, I don't really find/understand what you are doing to the surface normals to get "correct" lighting in NDC space. In my example, would it be sufficient to "remove" the projective part from the inverse-transpose-modelview matrix so that normals are only transformed by the "true" modelview matrix? I am very much an OGL newb, so please bear with me :D –  user1845810 Nov 22 '12 at 19:15
    
Did you read my answer? Also, the tutorial doesn't do lighting in NDC space. The space of the rendered positions doesn't have to be the space you do lighting in. –  Nicol Bolas Nov 22 '12 at 19:49

2 Answers 2

glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);
glLoadIdentity();
glScalef(1.0f, 1.0f, -1.0f);
glMultMatrixd(projectionMat);

The projection matrix goes into glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);. Transforming the normals happens with the inverse transpose of the modelview. If there's a projection component in the modelview it messes up your normal transformation.

The correct code would be

glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);
glLoadMatrixd(projectionMat);

glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);
glLoadIdentity();
glScalef(1.0f, 1.0f, -1.0f);
glMultMatrixd(modelviewMat);
glEnable(GL_LIGHTING);
draw_model();
glDisable(GL_LIGHTING);
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1  
Thanks, but you misunderstood what I am trying to do. I know perfectly well where the projection matrix is stored (and, actually, there IS a correct perspective projection matrix stored in GL_PROJECTION mode). However, the purpose of my entire code is to visualize the "distortion" introduced by the perspective projection by drawing the model as transformed by the perspective projection. I assure you my code is correct and - geometrically - achieving what I want. The only issue I have is the lighting. –  user1845810 Nov 22 '12 at 19:00
    
@user1845810: Oh, well, this of course doesn't go so well along with the fixed function pipeline. So why not simply use a vertex shader? Therein you can do all calculations as you need them and also decouple normal calculation from some "modelview" matrix; instead you pass a separate normal transformation matrix, that's derived from the not-yet-projected modelview. –  datenwolf Nov 22 '12 at 19:12
    
Sadly, I am fairly new to OGL and have no clue how to use vertex shaders. This wouldn't be a problem in general, but as my code might be used within a fixed-function-only university assignment, I guess it would be better to not use vertex shaders. –  user1845810 Nov 22 '12 at 19:22
    
@user1845810: Please tell your professor or TA that fixed function is outdated and every hardware sold these days supports at least shader model 2 (vertex and fragment shader), and most GPUs in the wild support at least shader model 3; anyway, you could put that double projection both into the GL_PROJECTION matrix to decouple the normals transformation from it. –  datenwolf Nov 22 '12 at 19:34

If you're using fixed-function, you must put all of this in your projection matrix. Including the scale, translation, and rotation that happens after the projection:

glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);
glLoadIdentity();
glScalef(1.0f, 1.0f, -1.0f);
glMultMatrixd(projectionMat);

glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);
glLoadIdentity();
glMultMatrixd(modelviewMat);
glEnable(GL_LIGHTING);
draw_model();
glDisable(GL_LIGHTING);

This works because the positions (ie: what you see) are transformed by both the projection and modelview matrices, but the fixed-function lighting is done only in view space (ie: after modelview but before projection).

In fact, this is exactly why fixed-function GL has a distinction between the two matrices.

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