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If I have the two functions below. How can I select the function that will be chosen?

I imagine there is either some form of statement to determine the content of the scanner and therefore only have one function. Or it would be something that is passed to the function.

    public static int questionAsk(String question)
{
    Scanner scan = new Scanner (System.in);
    System.out.print (question+"\n");
    System.out.print ("Answer: ");
    return scan.nextInt();
}
    public static String questionAsk(String question)
{
    Scanner scan = new Scanner (System.in);
    System.out.print (question+"\n");
    System.out.print ("Answer: ");
    return scan.nextLine();
}
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4  
If you have those two methods in same class, it is a compilation error. Method return type does not count in method signature, and hence it is not a valid overloading. –  Rohit Jain Nov 22 '12 at 18:17
    
When you scan the System.in Do you know what type String or Int you will expect? Or do you have to analyze the answer and choose the java type that is best fitting? –  AlexWien Nov 22 '12 at 18:20
1  
You could rename to questionAskInt() and questionAskString() –  AlexWien Nov 22 '12 at 18:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is no way for the compiler to know which one of those methods you are calling. You could make it type safe by changing the String Types to something else, like this:

    public static int questionAsk(IntQuestion question)
{
    Scanner scan = new Scanner (System.in);
    System.out.print (question.toString() +"\n");
    System.out.print ("Answer: ");
    return scan.nextInt();
}
    public static String questionAsk(StringQuestion question)
{
    Scanner scan = new Scanner (System.in);
    System.out.print (question.toString() +"\n");
    System.out.print ("Answer: ");
    return scan.nextLine();
}

And adding two new classes:

   public class IntQuestion extends String{
       public IntQuestion(String question){
            super(question);
       }
   }

   public class StringQuestion extends String{
        public StringQuestion(String question){
            super(question);
        }
   }

When you construct an IntQuestion of StringQuestion, you can simply construct them the same way you would construct a String if you called the constructor:

IntQuestion intQuestion = new IntQuestion("Some String Here");

This is just a little bit of syntactic sugar to get the compiler to play nice and select the correct method based on the type.

I hope this helps.

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You should first scan, parse and then call the required function using if else or switch case.

What you are doing right now is using the same code in two functions, and not reusing the code. Just use a single scan instead

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A single method cant have two return types, which is what he needs. He needs to be able to return an int or a String. –  CaTalyst.X Nov 22 '12 at 18:27
    
We could return it as an object and check the instance of the returned object to determine if its a string or integer –  sheldonCooper Nov 22 '12 at 18:29
    
Yeah but type interrogation is ugly and it would require every method call to do type interrogation of the returned Object. –  CaTalyst.X Nov 22 '12 at 18:31
    
@sheldonCooper. Why you don't like Method Overloading? –  Rohit Jain Nov 22 '12 at 18:50

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