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I'm new to Java and I have struck with some doubt. For example, consider the expression like:

a.method()
a.method("string")

people call them "dynamic dispatch". But I'm sure that the type checker makes sure that the methods named method(),method(String a) available for object a.

But why does it called "dynamic"? It isn't static call? Since the compiler found that already?

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6  
Who exactly is calling this dynamic dispatch? Maybe there's more context (such as the method being overridden, as that part is dynamic. –  Jon Skeet Nov 22 '12 at 18:18
1  
The overloaded determination is static, but the potential polymorphic code is dynamic –  Matthew Nov 22 '12 at 18:19
1  
Nobody calls it "dynamic dispatch", let me assure you. Unless they don't know what they are talking about. –  Marko Topolnik Nov 22 '12 at 18:21
1  
@pst The dispatch on the arguments inside parentheses is not dynamic, and that's what OP is asking about, isn't it? –  Marko Topolnik Nov 22 '12 at 18:22
1  
@pst No point in arguing when we obviously agree on everything except on what OP actually asked :) Yes of course, Java is a dynamic dispatch language, but OP asked whether the dispatch of method on its parenthesized arguments can be called "dynamic". Both of us agree that no, it can't. –  Marko Topolnik Nov 22 '12 at 18:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The example that you have posted will not use dynamic dispatch. You have posted an example of Method Overloading. And decision of method invocation in case of Overloading is done at compile time. It is on the compiler to decide which method will be invoked based on the formal parameters and the actual arguments passed.


Dynamic Binding comes into play when you are working with Method Overriding, where the decision of which method will actually be invoked is delayed till runtime.

For e.g: -

class A {
    public void demo() { }
}

class B extends A {
    public void demo() { }
}

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        A a = new B();
        a.demo();   // B class method will be invoked.

        A obj = new A();
        obj.demo();  // A class method will be invoked.
    }
}

The decision of which method is invoked is decided on the basis of which class instance the particular reference is pointing to, And that is only known at runtime. And hence Dynamic Dispatch.

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The code you are showing doesn't express dynamic dispatch(binding).look at the below code.

class Super {
  public void method() {}
}

class Sub extends Super {
  public void method() {}

  public static void main(String... args) {
    Super inst = new Sub();
    inst.method(); //Sub's method() would be invoked.(Express's Dynamic Dispatch)
  }
}
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