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#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

void fn(const void *l) {
    // How to print the value of l. The below line is giving error
    cout << "***" << *l;
}

int main() {
    cout << "Hello World!";
    int d = 5;

    fn((char *) &d);
    return 0;
}

Error:

In function 'void fn(const void*)': Line 8: error: 'const void*' is not a pointer-to-object type compilation terminated due to -Wfatal-errors.

Tried Casting as seen below. It didnt not help. Please provide suggestions.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

void fn(const void *l) {
    // How to print the value of l. The below line is giving error
    int *pInt = static_cast<char*>(l);
    cout << *pInt;
}

int main() {
    cout << "Hello World!";
    int d = 5;

    fn((char *) &d);
    return 0;
}

In function 'void fn(const void*)': Line 9: error: static_cast from type 'const void*' to type 'char*' casts away constness compilation terminated due to -Wfatal-errors

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You cannot dereference a pointer to cv void. –  rightfold Nov 22 '12 at 18:24
    
void* can not be dereferenced. It has to be casted into a pointer of concrete type. –  sgarizvi Nov 22 '12 at 18:25

4 Answers 4

up vote -6 down vote accepted
cout << "***" << *(int*)l ;
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This worked.. Great.. Thanks ! –  Rachel Nov 22 '12 at 18:41
3  
what if I call it as fn(new char);? Isn't that undefined behavior? This is the worst kind of suggestion. Something that leads to the expected behavior, and, for the untrained eye provides a solution. Dangerous. –  Luchian Grigore Nov 22 '12 at 18:45

You can't. Not unless you interpret the void pointer as something.

Put yourself in the function's shoes: I give you a pointer to "something". You don't know what that something is. I tell you to print that something. What do you do?

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You want to display value of a pointer itself, or value pointed by it? In the first case, simple

 cout << p;

is sufficient. If you want to achieve the second thing - it is not possible - pointer points to void, and it cannot be dereferenced, because compiler does not know the type of value 'hidden' behind it.

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+1, you are actually answering the question, although OP might not be aware of it. –  juanchopanza Nov 22 '12 at 18:52

The standard requires an explicit cast when dereferencing a void pointer.

Not only the compiler itself but also the standard doesn't allow this.

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