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Noob to C++.

I'm trying to get user input (Last Name, First Name Middle Name), change part of it (Middle Name to Middle Initial) and then rearrange it (First Middle Initial Last).

Where am I messing up in my code?

--Thanks for ANY help you can offer!

...

#include <iostream>
using std::cout;
using std::cin;

#include <string>
using std::string;

int main()
{

  string myString, last, first, middle;

  cout << "Enter your name: Last, First Middle";

  cin >> last >> first >> middle;

  char comma, space1, space2;

  comma = myString.find_first_of(',');
  space1 = myString.find_first_of(' ');
  space2 = myString.find_last_of(' ');

  last = myString.substr (0, comma); // user input last name
  first = myString.substr (space1+1, -1); // user input first name
  middle = myString.substr (space2+1, -1); // user input middle name

  middle.insert (0, space2+1); // inserts middle initial in front of middle name
  middle.erase (1, -1); // deletes full middle name, leaving only middle initial

  myString = first + ' ' + middle + ' ' + last; //  

  return 0;
}
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4 Answers 4

Well you search for things in myString but never set it to anything (it's an empty string).

You should read one whole line into myString.

std::getline(std::cin, myString);

Then you can look out for the , and spaces etc. The second problem is that you should use size_t as the type of comma, space1 and space2. These keep the positions of the spaces and commas in the string: If the comma or space isn't found in input, then the find functions return string::npos, which is the highest value in a size_t. But this would overflow a char. For reliably assigning the position, you should thus change the type of these three variables to size_t.

Then instead of using -1 to say that you want to extract a substring until end just omit it: It has a default argument for that parameter which specifies string::npos. If you really want to pass it, maybe because it improves readability for you, use string::npos instead: It has the right type (size_t), and won't need a conversion of int (with value -1) to it.

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shouldn't this line :

cin >> last >> first >> middle;

be

cin >> myString;

?

Because after that you search for the comma and spaces in myString but this string contains nothing.

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5  
That won't work, because it will stop reading the line at the first space. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Aug 29 '09 at 17:37
3  
How'd this get so many upvotes... it won't work unless they enter their names without spaces... –  DeusAduro Aug 29 '09 at 20:58
    
@DeusAduro i didn't understand that either, That's why i upvoted litb's comment and anwser. JW should accept litb's answer so it goes up in the page and get highlighted. –  p4bl0 Aug 30 '09 at 13:07

I fixed your code!

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

int main()
{

  string myString, last, first, middle;

  cout << "Enter your name: Last, First Middle" << endl;

  getline(cin, myString);

  char comma, space1, space2;

  comma = myString.find_first_of(',');
  space1 = myString.find_first_of(' ');
  space2 = myString.find_last_of(' ');

  last = myString.substr (0, comma); // user input last name
  first = myString.substr (space1+1, space2 - space1); // user input first name
  middle = myString.substr (space2+1, -1); // user input middle name

  middle.erase(1, -1); // erases full middle name, only leaving the first character as initial

  cout << first << " " << middle << ". " << last << endl;//displays output

  return 0;
}

An easier way is to declare the whole namespace.

using namespace std;

Do try to use getline()if you want to include spaces in your input string.

getline(cin, myString);

Right here, you shouldn't use -1 for your second parameter, else first will gladly be assigned of the rest of the string input.

first = myString.substr (space1+1, space2 - space1);

Also, the function middle.erase can't really accept a char as a parameter, a better way to go about this is to just write -1 as you are trying to get rid of everything after the first char.

middle.erase(1, -1);

Finally, myString = first + ' ' + middle + ' ' + last; don't, just don't. I assume you are trying to display the results, std::cout would do just fine.

cout << first << " " << middle << ". " << last << endl;
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Also instead of declearing so many using statements you could just include the namespace std ,so it should look like this.

//include headers..
using namespace std;
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