Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to create an interface inheritance system that uses the same property but always of a further derived type. So the base property should be somehow overridden or hidden by the deriving interface.

Take, for instance, two interfaces, Man and Woman, that derive into Husband and Wife, also interfaces. Man and Husband interfaces both have a "sweetheart" property, while Woman and Wife have a "darling" property. Now, the Man's "sweetheart" property is of type Woman, while the Husband's same "sweetheart" property should be a Wife (derived from Woman). And the same with the Woman and Wife's "darling" property.

public interface Man // base interface for Husband
{
    Woman sweetheart { get; set; }
}

public interface Woman // base interface for Wife
{
    Man darling { get; set; }
}

public interface Husband : Man // extending Man interface
{
    new Wife sweetheart { get; set; } // narrowing "sweetheart" property's type
}

public interface Wife : Woman // extending Woman interface
{
    new Husband darling { get; set; } // narrowing "darling" property's type
}

public class RandomHusband : Husband // implementing the Husband interface
{
    private RandomWife wife;
    public Wife sweetheart { get { return wife; } set { wife = value; } }
}

public class RandomWife : Wife // implementing the Wife interface
{
    private RandomHusband husband;
    public Husband darling { get { return husband; } set { husband = value; } }
}

This code is wrong, it doesn't work. I'm beeing notified that I didn't implement the basic Man.sweetheart and Woman.darling properties, and that the implemented Husband.sweetheart and Wife.darling will not do, because the types don't match. Is there any way of narrowing a property's type to a derived one? How do you attain it in C#?

share|improve this question
    
interesting question :) –  nawfal Nov 22 '12 at 20:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

you will still need to satisy the Man and Woman interfaces as well as the Husband and Wife...

public class RandomWife : Wife // implementing the Wife interface

    {
        private RandomHusband husband;
        public Husband darling { get { return husband; } set { husband = value; } }
        public Man  Wife.darling { get { return husband; } set { /* can't set anything */ } }

    }
share|improve this answer
    
You cant set husband in your explicit implementation without a cast, and there's no guarantee it will be a RandomHusband instance. If the set; can be removed from IWife/IHusband, this would be ideal. –  drch Nov 22 '12 at 19:58
    
very good point... –  Keith Nicholas Nov 22 '12 at 20:10
    
After all, I did it your way, and it's fine. Thanks for the idea, Keith. It was actually Lee's answer the closest to what I asked, the way I asked it, but in yhe real code, I had a more comlex situation than I presented. And it turned out that the simplicity of your method was just it. –  Paul Roman Nov 24 '12 at 20:43

You can do this by parameterising your Man and Woman interfaces with the concrete implementation types:

public interface IMan<M, W>
    where M : IMan<M, W>
    where W : IWoman<W, M>
{
    W Sweetheart { get; set; }
}

 public interface IWoman<W, M>
    where W : IWoman<W, M>
    where M : IMan<M, W>
{
    M Darling { get; set; }
}

Your implementations are then:

public class Man : IMan<Man, Woman>
{
    public Woman Sweetheart { get; set; }
}

public class Woman : IWoman<Woman, Man>
{
    public Man Darling { get; set; }
}

public class Husband : IMan<Husband, Wife>
{
    public Wife Sweetheart { get; set; }
}

public class Wife : IWoman<Wife, Husband>
{
    public Husband Darling { get; set; }
}

Since the types get quite complicated, you might want to consider moving the relationship into an external class/interface:

public interface Relationship<TMan, TWoman> 
    where TMan : Man 
    where TWoman : Woman
{
    TMan Darling { get; }
    TWoman Sweetheart { get; }
}

public class Marriage : Relationship<Husband, Wife>
{
}

Then you can use this class to retain type safety when dealing with concrete implementations:

public static void HandleMarriage(Relationship<Husband, Wife> marriage)
{
    Husband h = marriage.Darling;
    Wife w = marriage.Sweetheart;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.