Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can you please help me with C#. I am trying to create a function in C# that opens a CSV file and save them to an array:

FileStream fileStream = new FileStream(guid.ToString(), FileMode.Open);
for (int i = 1; i > 200; i++) // it checks the first 200 lines
{
    int j = 0;
    string[] str = new string[j];
    do
    {                
        // saving each character to the variable until comma is found

    } while(str == '\n'); // read each character in a for loop until new line character found
}

Can you please help me out?

share|improve this question
1  
You could cheat by 'borrowing' a nice implementation from the VisualBasis.Net assembly: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  rene Nov 22 '12 at 19:51
    
Be carefull if you do it yourself, there's some special characters in csv file. –  the_lotus Nov 22 '12 at 20:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Something like this:

using (StreamReader r = new StreamReader(guid.ToString()))
{
    string line;
    int linesCount;
    ArrayList result = new ArrayList();
    while ((line = r.ReadLine()) != null && linesCount++ <= 200)
    {
         result.AddRange(line.Split(','));
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Parsing CSV by hand is actually pretty tricky. You might be better off reusing the TextFieldParser (add a reference to the Microsoft.VisualBasic assembly).

using Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO;

....

string[,] parsedCsv;
List<string[]> csvLines = new List<string[]>();
TextFieldParser parser = new TextFieldParser(new FileStream(guid.ToString(), FileMode.Open));
parser.Delimiters = new string[] { "," };
parser.TextFieldType = FieldType.Delimited;
int maxLines = 200, lineCount = 0;

try
{
    while (!parser.EndOfData && lineCount++ < maxLines)
    {
        csvLines.Add(parser.ReadFields());
    }
}
catch (MalformedLineException)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Line Number: {0} Value: {1}", parser.ErrorLineNumber, parser.ErrorLine);
    return;
}

parsedCsv = new string[csvLines.Count, csvLines[0].Length];

for (int i = 0; i < csvLines.Count; i++)
{
    for (int j = 0; j < csvLines[i].Length; j++)
    {
        parsedCsv[i, j] = csvLines[i][j];
    }
}

I have assumed here that the output is going to be a 2-D array of strings - you may need to adjust this code depending on what you are after, especially if you have to cope with the situation where each line does not have the same number of fields (perhaps unlikely, but still).

The really useful thing about TextFieldParser is that it will cope with different kinds of delimeters. By setting parser.Delimiters = new string[] { "\t" };, for example, this same code could parse tab-delimited text.

share|improve this answer
    
Why go to all this trouble when LINQ does it so nicely with the .Split() extension? –  Jesse Carter Nov 22 '12 at 20:46
    
@JesseCarter try parsing "a,b,c,\"x,y,z\"" with .Split() and you'll see what I mean. –  nick_w Nov 22 '12 at 20:51
    
Fair enough but we have no reason to believe that his file is set up that way. The majority of CSV files that I have ever seen have single CSV entries on each line and can be easily parsed using string.Split on the delimiter –  Jesse Carter Nov 22 '12 at 20:56
    
That's quite true, but making these sorts of assumptions about the format is risky, particularly in view of the fact that the CSV format is more complex than most people think. For example, anything that relies on ReadLine is brittle because a quoted CSV field can contain a newline character. –  nick_w Nov 22 '12 at 21:17

What about:

string[] lines = File.ReadAllLines(path);
if(lines.Length >= 200){
    for(int i = 0; i < 200; i++){
          string[] str = lines[i].Split(',');
          //do something here
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You can just use the string.Split(',') extension method.

using (StreamReader streamReader = new StreamReader(File.OpenRead(guid.ToString())))
{
    for (int i = 0; i <= 200; ++i)
    {    
        string[] str = streamReader.ReadLine().Split(',');
    }
}

The Split extension method will return a string array of the individual values separated by a comma.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.