Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a matrix like

A= [ 1 2 4
     2 3 1
     3 1 2 ]

and I would like to calculate its cumulative sum by row and by column, that is, I want the result to be

B = [ 1  3  7 
      3  8  13 
      6  12 19 ]

Any ideas of how to make this in R in a fast way? (Possibly using the function cumsum) (I have huge matrices)

Thanks!

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

A one-liner:

t(apply(apply(A, 2, cumsum)), 1, cumsum))

The underlying observation is that you can first compute the cumulative sums over the columns and then the cumulative sum of this matrix over the rows.

Note: When doing the rows, you have to transpose the resulting matrix.

Your example:

> apply(A, 2, cumsum)
     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]    1    2    4
[2,]    3    5    5
[3,]    6    6    7

> t(apply(apply(A, 2, cumsum), 1, cumsum))
     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]    1    3    7
[2,]    3    8   13
[3,]    6   12   19

About performance: I have now idea how good this approach scales to big matrices. Complexity-wise, this should be close to optimal. Usually, apply is not that bad in performance as well.


Edit

Now I was getting curious - what approach is the better one? A short benchmark:

> A <- matrix(runif(1000*1000, 1, 500), 1000)
> 
> system.time(
+   B <- t(apply(apply(A, 2, cumsum), 1, cumsum))
+ )
       User      System     elapsed 
      0.082       0.011       0.093 
> 
> system.time(
+   C <- lower.tri(diag(nrow(A)), diag = TRUE) %*% A %*% upper.tri(diag(ncol(A)), diag = TRUE)
+ )
       User      System     elapsed 
      1.519       0.016       1.530 

Thus: Apply outperforms matrix multiplication by a factor of 15. (Just for comparision: MATLAB needed 0.10719 seconds.) The results do not really surprise, as the apply-version can be done in O(n^2), while the matrix multiplication will need approx. O(n^2.7) computations. Thus, all optimizations that matrix multiplication offers should be lost if n is big enough.

share|improve this answer
    
Great idea! Thanks! –  madness Nov 22 '12 at 20:57
    
+1 I actually can't think of anything better (despite what the deleted Answer said - serious brain fail there coupled with a error creating A). –  Gavin Simpson Nov 22 '12 at 21:05
2  
@Gavin: Brain fail happens all the time - at least in my case ;) - However, your solution made me think. Matrix multiplication with triangular matrices would work. In MATLAB: tril(ones(3,3)) * A * triu(ones(3,3)). R sadly does not offer good support for triangular matrices, so creating suitable matrices probably would kill all speed gains that could be archived by matrix multiplication. Great idea, though. –  Thilo Nov 22 '12 at 21:10
    
@Thilo Yes, that's kind of what I had in mind before my brain failed and diag() snuck in there. –  Gavin Simpson Nov 22 '12 at 21:20
1  
@Thilo That would be lower.tri(A,T) %*% A %*% upper.tri(A,T) in R. –  Charles Nov 23 '12 at 1:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.