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Guys i have few queries in pointers. Kindly help to resolve them

char a[]="this is an array of characters"; // declaration type 1 
char *b="this is an array of characters";//  declaration type 2

question.1 : what is the difference between these 2 types of declaration ?

    printf("%s",*b); // gives a segmentation fault
    printf("%s",b); // displays the string

question.2 : i didn't get how is it working

    char *d=malloc(sizeof(char)); // 1)
    scanf("%s",d); // 2)
    printf("%s",d);// 3)

question.3 how many bytes are being allocated to the pointer c? when i try to input a string, it takes just a word and not the whole string. why so ?

    char c=malloc(sizeof(char)); // 4)
    scanf("%c",c); // 5)
    printf("%c",c);// 6)

question.4 when i try to input a charcter why does it throw a segmentation fault?

Thanks in advance.. Waiting for your reply guys..

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3  
... and gals ... –  glglgl Nov 22 '12 at 21:14
    
Code snippet 3 would not compile without warning. 2+3: Read man scanf. –  alk Nov 22 '12 at 21:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted
char a[]="this is an array of characters"; // declaration type 1 
char *b="this is an array of characters";//  declaration type 2

Here you are declaring two variables, a and b, and initializing them. "this is an array of characters" is a string literal, which in C has type array of char. a has type array of char. In this specific case, the array does not get converted to a pointer, and a gets initialized with the array "this is an array of characters". b has type pointer to char, the array gets converted to a pointer, and b gets initialized with a pointer to the array "this is an array of characters".

printf("%s",*b); // gives a segmentation fault
printf("%s",b); // displays the string

In an expression, *b dereferences the pointer b, so it evaluates to the char pointed by b, i.e: T. This is not an address (which is what "%s" is expecting), so you get undefined behavior, most probably a crash (but don't try to do this on embedded systems, you could get mysterious behaviour and corrupted data, which is worse than a crash). In the second case, %s expects a pointer to a char, gets it, and can proceed to do its thing.

char *d=malloc(sizeof(char)); // 1)
scanf("%s",d); // 2)
printf("%s",d);// 3)

In C, sizeof returns the size in bytes of an object (= region of storage). In C, a char is defined to be the same as a byte, which has at least 8 bits, but can have more (but some standards put additional restrictions, e.g: POSIX requires 8-bit bytes, i.e: octets). So, you are allocating 1 byte. When you call scanf(), it writes in the memory pointed to by d without restraint, overwriting everything in sight. scanf() allows maximum field widths, so:

  • Allocate more memory, at least enough for what you want + 1 terminating ASCII NUL.
  • Tell scanf() to stop, e.g: scanf("%19s") for a maximum 19 characters (you'll need 20 bytes to store that, counting the terminating ASCII NUL).

And last (if markdown lets me):

char c=malloc(sizeof(char)); // 4)
scanf("%c",c); // 5)
printf("%c",c);// 6)

c is not a pointer, so you are trying to store an address where you shouldn't. In scanf, "%c" expects a pointer to char, which should point to an object (=region of storage) with enough space for the specified field width, 1 by default. Since c is not a pointer, the above may crash in some platforms (and cause worse things on others).

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great answers :) thanks :) –  anonymous Nov 22 '12 at 22:38
    
in the 2nd question, how is *b getting dereferenced? –  anonymous Nov 22 '12 at 22:40
1  
@anonymous: *b is not getting dereferenced, b is. In an expression, unary * is the dereference operator. –  ninjalj Nov 22 '12 at 22:44
    
got it thanks :) –  anonymous Nov 22 '12 at 23:01
printf("%s",*b); // gives a segmentation fault
printf("%s",b); // displays the string

the %s expects a pointer to array of chars.

char *c=malloc(sizeof(char)); // you are allocating only 1 byte aka char, not array of char!
scanf("%s",c); // you need pass a pointer to array, not a pointer to char
printf("%s",c);// you are printing a array of chars, but you are sending a char

you need do this:

int sizeofstring = 200; // max size of buffer
char *c = malloc(sizeof(char))*sizeofstring; //almost equals to declare char c[200]
scanf("%s",c);
printf("%s",c);

question.3 how many bytes are being allocated to the pointer c? when i try to input a string, it takes just a word and not the whole string. why so ?

In your code, you only are allocating 1 byte because sizeof(char) = 1byte = 8bit, you need allocate sizeof(char)*N, were N is your "string" size.

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I see several problems in your code.

Question 1: The difference is:

  • a gets allocated in writable memory, the so-called data segment. Here you can read and write as much as you want. sizeof a is the length of the string plus 1, the so-called string terminator (just a null byte).
  • b, however, is just a pointer to a string which is located in the rodata. That means, in a data area which is read only. sizeof b is whatever is the pointer size on your system, maybe 4 or 8 on a PC or 2 on many embedded systems.

Question 2: The printf() format wants a pointer to a string. With *b, you dereferene the pointer you have and give it the first byte of data, which is a t (ASCII 84 or something like that). The callee, however, treats it as a pointer, dereferences it and BAM.

With b, however, everything goes fine, as it is exactly the right call.

Question 3: malloc(sizeof(char)) allocates exactly one byte. sizeof(char) is 1 by definition, so the call is effectively malloc(1). The input just takes a word because %s is defined that way.

Question 4:

char c=malloc(sizeof(char)); // 4)

shound give you a warning: malloc() returns a pointer which you try to put into a char. ITYM char *...

As you continue, you give that pointer to scanf(), which receives e.g. instead of 0x80043214 a mere 0x14, interprets it as a pointer and BAM again.

The correct way would be

char * c=malloc(1024);
scanf("%1024s", c);
printf("%s", c);

Why? Well, you want to read a string. 1 byte is too small, better allocate more.

In scanf() you should take care that you don't allow reading more than your buffer can hold - thus the limitation in the format specifier.

and on printing, you should use %s, because you want the whole string to be printed and not only the first character. (At least, I suppose so.)

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Thanks for the answers sir. Yea i got your answers but then in question 2, how come is it dereferencing the pointer b ? its just trying to display the the value which is being pointed by b. please correct me if am wrong. –  anonymous Nov 22 '12 at 22:03

Ad Q1: The first is an array of chars with a fixed pointer a pointing to it. sizeof(a) will return something like 20 (strlen(a)+1). Trying to assign something to a (like a = b) will fail, since a is fixed.

The second is a pointer pointing to an array of char and hence is the sizeof(b) usually 4 on 32-bit or 8 on 64-bit. Assigning something to b will work, since the pointer can take a new value.

Of course, *a or *b work on both.

Ad Q2: printf() with the %s argument takes a pointer to a char (those are the "strings" in C). Hence, printf("%s", *b) will crash, since the "pointer" used by printf() will contain the byte value of *b.

What you could do, is printf("%c", *b), but that would only print the first character.

Ad Q3: sizeof(char) is 1 (by definition), hence you allocate 1 byte. The scanf will most likely read more than one byte (remember that each string will be terminated by a null character occupying one char). Hence the scanf will trash memory, likely to cause memory sometime later on.

Ad 4: Maybe that's the trashed memory.

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Both declaration are the same. b point to the first byte so when you say *b it's the first character. printf("%s", *b) Will fail as %s accepts a pointer to a string. char is one byte.

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No, there is a huge difference between these declarations... –  glglgl Nov 22 '12 at 21:26
    
In the context of what he is trying to do... –  anojmperera Nov 22 '12 at 21:32

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