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can a static method be invoked before even a single instances of the class is constructed?

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When learning java, one of your first encounters with static concepts is the use of System.out.println(). It is an interesting bit of code, in particular System and System.out; let alone the implementations of println(). –  Brian Aug 29 '09 at 19:39

8 Answers 8

absolutely, this is the purpose of static methods:

class ClassName {

     public static void staticMethod() {

     }
}

In order to invoke a static method you must import the class:

import ClassName;
// ...
ClassName.staticMethod();

or using static imports (Java 5 or above):

import static ClassName.staticMethod;
// ...
staticMethod();
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Yes, that is exactly what static methods are for.

ClassName.staticMethodName();

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As others have already suggested, it is definitely possible to call a static method on a class without (previously) creating an instance--this is how Singletons work. For example:

import java.util.Calendar;
public class MyClass 
{
    // the static method Calendar.getInstance() is used to create 
    // [Calendar]s--note that [Calendar]'s constructor is private
    private Calendar now = Calendar.getInstance();
}

If you mean, "is it possible to automatically call a specific static method before the first object is initialized?", see below:

public class MyClass
{
    // the static block is garanteed to be executed before the
    // first [MyClass] object is created.
    static {
        MyClass.init();
    }

    private static void init() {
        // do something ...
    }
}
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Yes, because static methods cannot access instance variables, so all the JVM has to do is run the code.

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thank you very much –  Abhishek Sanghvi Aug 29 '09 at 18:21

Static methods are meant to be called without instantiating the class.

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Yes, you can access it by writing ClassName.methodName before creating any instance.

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Not only can you do that, but you should do it.

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thank you very much –  Abhishek Sanghvi Aug 29 '09 at 18:22

In fact, there are a lot of "utility classes", like Math, Collections, Arrays, and System, which are classes that cannot be instantiated, but whose whole purpose is to provide static methods for people to use.

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