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You may consider me a PostgreSQL beginner, and the purpose of this question is to get insights into how to get the best performance out of PostgreSQL for this problem. I have two tables which are identical in their structure but differ in their content.

|Table A|
key - value
1     dave
2     paul
3     michael

|Table B|
key - value
1     dave
2     chris

The problem is simple, to replace table A with table B, but to know which entries were inserted into or removed from table A in the operation.

My first (naive) solution involves doing the work in two stages using table joins to produce the intermediate lists for first the delete and then the insert operations. The results of those queries are stored on the client and are required for correct application function.

SELECT * FROM A LEFT JOIN B ON A.value = B.value WHERE B.value IS NULL;
DELETE FROM A WHERE value IN ("paul", "michael");

SELECT * FROM B LEFT JOIN A ON A.value = B.value WHERE A.value IS NULL;
INSERT INTO A (value) VALUES "chris";

This simple approach does technically work, by the end of the transaction table A will contain the same content as table B, but this strategy quickly becomes quite slow. To give an indication of the size of the tables, it's in the range of millions of rows, so performance at scale is a critical factor, and it would be nice to find a more optimal approach.

In order to address performance requirements, I plan to investigate the following:

  1. Use of HStore back-end for optimal key-value storage performance.
  2. Use of views for pre-calculating intermediate delete/insert queries.
  3. Use of prepared queries to reduce SQL processing overhead.

My question to the experts is can you suggest what you consider to be the optimal strategy. Going slightly beyond the scope of my question, are there any hard and fast rules you can suggest?

Thank you so much for your time. All feedback is very welcome.

share|improve this question
    
Do you need to keep exact key - value pairs, or you only need equal sets of value in tables? – Igor Romanchenko Nov 22 '12 at 21:49
1  
Is it required at the end of sync for same key have the same value? For example, should 2=>paul become 2=>chris or what? – mvp Nov 22 '12 at 21:55
    
Those sample SQL statements are invalid syntax (" instead of ', and missing brackets for the `values clause) – a_horse_with_no_name Nov 22 '12 at 22:07
    
If you wanted to do this efficiently you'd have a surrogate key in table A. – Tony Hopkinson Nov 22 '12 at 22:17
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is not perfect, but it works. The thee cases (delete,update,insert) could possibly be combined into a full outer join.

DROP SCHEMA tmp CASCADE;
CREATE SCHEMA tmp ;
SET search_path=tmp;

CREATE TABLE table_a (
        zkey INTEGER NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY
        , zvalue varchar NOT NULL
        , CONSTRAINT a_zvalue_alt UNIQUE (zvalue)
        );
INSERT INTO table_a(zkey, zvalue) VALUES
 (1, 'dave' )
,(2, 'paul' )
,(3, 'michael' )
        ;

CREATE TABLE table_b (
        zkey INTEGER NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY
        , zvalue varchar NOT NULL
        , CONSTRAINT b_zvalue_alt UNIQUE (zvalue)
        );
INSERT INTO table_b(zkey, zvalue) VALUES
(1, 'dave' )
,(2, 'chris' )
,(5, 'Arnold' )
        ;

CREATE TABLE table_diff (
        zkey INTEGER NOT NULL
        , zvalue varchar NOT NULL
        , opcode INTEGER NOT NULL DEFAULT 0
        );

WITH xx AS (
        DELETE FROM table_a aa
        WHERE NOT EXISTS (
                SELECT * FROM table_b bb
                WHERE bb.zkey = aa.zkey
                )
        RETURNING aa.zkey, aa.zvalue
        )
INSERT INTO table_diff(zkey,zvalue,opcode)
SELECT xx.zkey, xx.zvalue, -1
FROM xx
        ;

SELECT * FROM table_diff;

WITH xx AS (
        UPDATE table_a aa
        SET zvalue= bb.zvalue
        FROM table_b bb
        WHERE bb.zkey = aa.zkey
        AND bb.zvalue <> aa.zvalue
        RETURNING aa.zkey, aa.zvalue
        )
INSERT INTO table_diff(zkey,zvalue,opcode)
SELECT xx.zkey, xx.zvalue, 0
FROM xx
        ;
SELECT * FROM table_diff;

WITH xx AS (
        INSERT INTO table_a (zkey, zvalue)
        SELECT bb.zkey, bb.zvalue
        FROM table_b bb
        WHERE NOT EXISTS (
                SELECT * FROM table_a aa
                WHERE bb.zkey = aa.zkey
                AND bb.zvalue = aa.zvalue
                )
        RETURNING zkey, zvalue
        )
INSERT INTO table_diff(zkey,zvalue,opcode)
SELECT xx.zkey, xx.zvalue, 1
FROM xx
        ;
SELECT * FROM table_a;
SELECT * FROM table_b;
SELECT * FROM table_diff;

Result:

INSERT 0 3
CREATE TABLE
INSERT 0 1
 zkey | zvalue  | opcode 
------+---------+--------
    3 | michael |     -1
(1 row)

INSERT 0 1
 zkey | zvalue  | opcode 
------+---------+--------
    3 | michael |     -1
    2 | chris   |      0
(2 rows)

INSERT 0 1
 zkey | zvalue 
------+--------
    1 | dave
    2 | chris
    5 | Arnold
(3 rows)

 zkey | zvalue 
------+--------
    1 | dave
    2 | chris
    5 | Arnold
(3 rows)

 zkey | zvalue  | opcode 
------+---------+--------
    3 | michael |     -1
    2 | chris   |      0
    5 | Arnold  |      1
(3 rows)

BTW: the OQ is very vague about requirements. If the table_diff would be an actual history table, at least a timestamp-column should be added, and zkey and ztimestamp would be a natural choice for a key. Also, the whole process could be wrapped in a set of rules or triggers.

share|improve this answer

Try using this queries:

DELETE FROM A 
WHERE A.value NOT IN (SELECT B.value FROM B);

INSERT INTO A(value)
SELECT B.value
FROM B
WHERE B.value NOT IN (SELECT A.value FROM A)

With indexes on A.value and B.value this queries will be really fast.

share|improve this answer

If you have value indexed in both tables, and value is unique in each table, this is a case for a full outer join, which should be able to merge the two by walking through the indices:

SELECT CASE WHEN B.value IS NULL THEN
       'DELETE FROM A WHERE A.value = ' || quote_literal(A.value)
            ELSE
       'INSERT INTO A(value) VALUES(' || quote_literal(B.value) || ')'
       END
FROM A FULL OUTER JOIN B ON A.value = B.value
WHERE A.value IS DISTINCT FROM B.value

The SQL generation here is really just to demo what the output of the query is.

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