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at the moment, I'm trying some pointer stuff in C. But now, I have a problem with a pointer array. By using my code below, I get a strange output. I think there is a big mistake in the code, but I can't find it.

I just want to print the strings of the pointer array.

#include <stdio.h>


int main(void)
{
    char *words[] = {"word1", "word2", "word3"};
    char *ptr;
    int i = 0;

    ptr = words[0];

    while(*ptr != '\0')
    {
        printf("%s", *(words+i));
        ptr++;
        i++;
    }

    return 0;
}

Output: word1word2word3Hã}¯Hɡ

Thanks for helping.

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What do you think this is doing printf("%s", *(words+i)); ? What are you actually trying to do? –  John3136 Nov 22 '12 at 22:10
    
I think *(words) gives me the first value of my array. So I'm trying to go from index 0 to index 2. –  eljobso Nov 22 '12 at 22:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
while(*ptr != '\0')
{
    printf("%s", *(words+i));
    ptr++;
    i++;
}

initially, ptr points to the 'w' in "word1". So the loop iterates five times until *ptr == '\0'. But the array words contains only three elements, thus the fourth and fifth iteration invoke undefined behaviour and garbage is printed when the bytes after the words array are interpreted as pointers to 0-terminated strings. It could easily crash, and if you try it on other systems, with other compilers or compiler settings, it will sometimes crash.

You could translate the loop to

for(i = 0; i < strlen(words[0]); ++i) {
    printf("%s", words[i]);
}

to see more easily what it does.

If you want to print out the strings in the words array, you can use

// this only worls because words is an actual array, not a pointer
int numElems = sizeof words / sizeof words[0];
for(i = 0; i < numElems; ++i) {
    printf("%s", words[i]);
}

As words is an actual array, you can obtain the number of elements it contains using sizeof. Then you loop as many times as the array has elements.

share|improve this answer
    
You sure about the condition in the for? Wouldn't that iterate 5 times? –  Luchian Grigore Nov 22 '12 at 22:18
    
allright, I get your point. Thanks. But how could I solve it. I'm a little helpless :-/. –  eljobso Nov 22 '12 at 22:18
    
@LuchianGrigore yes, five times, that's how many non-zero chars there are in "word1". –  Daniel Fischer Nov 22 '12 at 22:19
    
But for each iteration, you print words[i]... So the last iteration, you call printf("%s", words[4]); –  Luchian Grigore Nov 22 '12 at 22:21
    
@LuchianGrigore It's a translation of the original code, its purpose was to make it easier to see what the original does. –  Daniel Fischer Nov 22 '12 at 22:25

I think you intended ptr to iterate through the items in the words array, but in fact it is actually iterating through the characters of "word1". To iterate through the words array, while pretending to not know the number of items to iterate through, then change the while condition as follows:

int main(void)
{
    char *words[] = {"word1", "word2", "word3"};
    char numWords = sizeof(words) / sizeof( words[0]);
    int i = 0;

    while(i < numWords)
    {
        printf("%s", *(words+i));

        i++;
    }

    return 0;
}

If you really want to use ptr to iterate through the items of the words array, then change the words array and the while condition as follows:

int main(void)
{
    char *words[] = {"word1", "word2", "word3", NULL};
    char *ptr[] = words;
    int i = 0;

    while(ptr[i] != NULL)
    {
        printf("%s", *(words+i));

        i++;
    }

    return 0;
}
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