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I'm trying to find a regular expression in java that will extract pairs of consecutive words in a sentance, like in the example below.

input: word1 word2 word3 word4 ....

output:

  • word1 word2
  • word2 word3
  • word3 word4

etc..

any idea how to do that ?

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2  
Use String.split("\\s+") and work from there. –  Marko Topolnik Nov 22 '12 at 22:15
    
Why do you need that? –  Bergi Nov 22 '12 at 22:17
1  
I don't see how a regex can work here. If you match two words, the next match the regex will find after that will be the words that are after the two first matched words. So your first match would be "word1 word2", the next match will be "word3 word4". The split idea mentioned by Marko seems like a better solution. –  Francis Gagnon Nov 23 '12 at 0:02
1  
@FrancisGagnon The technique in regex is to capture a match from the zero-width lookahead (like in Omega's solution). It's a technique worth being aware of in general, even if it's not a good fit for this particular problem. –  Marko Topolnik Nov 23 '12 at 8:43
    
@Marko Agreed. It is an interesting technique. –  Francis Gagnon Nov 23 '12 at 12:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Java code:

Matcher m = Pattern.compile("(?:^|(?<=\\s))(?=(\\S+\\s+\\S+)(?=\\s|$))")
  .matcher("word1 word2 word3 word4");
while (m.find()) {
  System.out.println(m.group(1));
}

Output:

word1 word2
word2 word3
word3 word4

Test this code here.

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There you go: -

"\\w+\\s+\\w+"

One or more word, then one or more space, and then one or more word.


UPDATE : -

Just noticed that the above regex misses your second line of output. So you can just split your string on space, and work with your array.

String[] words = str.split("\\s+");

And then get word for every pair of indices.

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1  
This will miss OP's second line of output. –  Marko Topolnik Nov 22 '12 at 22:16
    
@MarkoTopolnik.. Yeah, didn't notice that. –  Rohit Jain Nov 22 '12 at 22:17
1  
you will get word1 word2 then word3 word4 ,etc..not what i'm looking for. –  Atai Voltaire Nov 22 '12 at 22:20
    
@AtaiVoltaire.. Yeah, I took care of that part. –  Rohit Jain Nov 22 '12 at 22:22

Here you are:

public class Example {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String words = "word1 word2 word3 word4";
        String regex="\\w+\\s+\\w+";
        Pattern p = Pattern.compile(regex);
        Matcher matcher = p.matcher(words);
        while(matcher.find()){
            String found = matcher.group();
            System.out.println(found);
            String splitted = found.split("\\s+")[1];
            words = words.replace(found, splitted);
            matcher = p.matcher(words);
        }
    }
}
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Too offer a solution without unjustified complexity...

final String in = "word1 word2 word3 word4";
final String[] words = in.split("\\s+");
for (int i = 0; i < words.length - 1; i++)
  System.out.println(words[i] + " " + words[i+1]);

prints

word1 word2
word2 word3
word3 word4
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