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My Website contains Radio buttons and check boxes.

When a user selects one within a form and submits it, this state is stored, such that when the user returns to the page, it is loaded in the state as per user's previous selection.

Some of these check boxes have child elements, which when their parents are checked, alter their disabled attribute so that they can be interacted with.

I use a jQuery function to achieve this.

If a user has previously selected a parent to disabled child elements, when they return to the page, I need the function that enables the child elements to run.

I also need this function to run every time the user selects one during a browsing session.

I am currently able to achieve this by duplicating my jQuery function, once inside a When DOM Ready encapsulation, and once without this.

I suspect this is bad practice, am I correct, and if so how shoudld I be doing it?

To illustrate my point here, is an example:

//First the code for DOM ready:
//You can see it disables and unchecks boxes if they are not checked etc.

$(function() {
    if ($('#parent').is(':checked')) {
            $('#child1').removeAttr('disabled');
            $('#child2').removeAttr('disabled');
    } else {
            $('#child1').attr('disabled', true);
            $('#child1').removeAttr('checked');
            $('#child2').attr('disabled', true);
            $('#child2').removeAttr('checked');
    }  

 });

//Now, the exact same function just without the DOM ready encapsulation.

if ($('#parent').is(':checked')) {
            $('#child1').removeAttr('disabled');
            $('#child2').removeAttr('disabled');
    } else {
            $('#child1').attr('disabled', true);
            $('#child1').removeAttr('checked');
            $('#child2').attr('disabled', true);
            $('#child2').removeAttr('checked');
    }  

Thanks for your advice.

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1  
It's redundant. I think you have a misunderstanding about what binding $.ready is –  Alexander Nov 22 '12 at 22:52
    
Oh! Well, that is odd then - as my experience doesn't corroobrate that: If I only have the one that is not DOM ready, then when the page loads, it does NOT alter the attributes of the input. Only when the user interacts with it. Likewise, if I only have the one that is DOM ready, it alters on page load, but not when a user clicks it. –  Gideon Nov 22 '12 at 22:59
    
There's no click event binding in your example code. In that case, I'd be a different question –  Alexander Nov 23 '12 at 7:44

2 Answers 2

So basically you want the state of your page to persist?

You can store state in several places:

  1. Clientside storage
  2. Cookies
  3. URL hash

Cookies is probably the easiest.

To correctly get the state to persist you have to keep track of the actual state. So, whenever the state of the DOM changes, store that change. Then when a user opens the page, look in the cookie and restore the state (this is the on DOM ready part).

This is not always an easy thing to do, because states can be very complex. Imagine you have a foldable tree of somesort, you'd need to keep track of which nodes are expanded.

If you just want to keep track of some checkboxes, it shouldn't be too hard.

share|improve this answer
    
Nope sorry, you misunderstand. I have it set up so state does persist, using stored variables (clientside storage, MySQL etc). The point of this, is that I need to alter the default "disabled" status of some input elements both on page load... AND if the user clicks on something during a browsing session. Storing state is not my issue. –  Gideon Nov 22 '12 at 22:57
    
element.setAttribute("disabled", false);? If this is the answer to your question then you should learn to make your questions more concise and to the point. –  Halcyon Nov 22 '12 at 23:03
    
Well, I am successfully able to disable an element, or enable it depending on the state of a parent element. That is not the issue. It is that I need to do it one TWO occasions: 1) When the page loads (if previously stored state requires it), 2) When the User clicks a parent element while browsing. Each block of code above seems to do one of these things, but the only difference is the encapsulation. Just to clarify - my system works exactly like I want it to, but I suspect it is bad practice. –  Gideon Nov 22 '12 at 23:06
    
Well, @FritsvanCampen, it isn't as far as I can tell, the answer (though you haven't explained an answer - are you suggesting I substitute that function for mine? That doesn't address my issue), but as I'll clarify my OP as I'm not getting through –  Gideon Nov 22 '12 at 23:09
    
If you want to run some code in two different events just put it in a function and call the function from both events? I'm really guessing at what your question is here. The state persistence has nothing to do with it then? Duplicate code is always a problem. –  Halcyon Nov 22 '12 at 23:12

Yes, duplicate code like that is bad practice. So if your code does what it should, you can write it like down below.

I believe you're using a CMS that performs some Form Ajax Tasks in an Ajax Framework, right? (e.g. Drupal?) Otherwise I cannot imagine why this code does what you described it does.

(function($) { 
    var init = function() {
            if ($('#parent').is(':checked')) {
                $('#child1').removeAttr('disabled');
                $('#child2').removeAttr('disabled');
            } else {
                $('#child1').attr('disabled', true);
                $('#child1').removeAttr('checked');
                $('#child2').attr('disabled', true);
                $('#child2').removeAttr('checked');
            }  
        }

    //first call
    init();

    //second call
    $(function() {
        init();
    });

})(jQuery);
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