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In our aplication we use Metal L&F. We are using a floatable JToolBar; it happens that when doing the drag behavior it appears with the Windows L&F.

May anyone say me how to keep Metal L&F when dragging the JToolBar?

Thanks

P.D. Our JToolBar is within a JPanel container that user BorderLayout Layout Manager.

Maybe I explained badly my question. So I post an example taken from The Java Tutorials to give anyone an idea of what happens to my application.

If you execute the following code the main JFrame appears decorated with Ocean Theme; but when I drag the JToolBar its decorated is not Ocean. What can I do??.

Many thanks in advance

package components;

/*
 * ToolBarDemo.java requires the following addditional files:
 * images/Back24.gif
 * images/Forward24.gif
 * images/Up24.gif
 */

 import java.awt.BorderLayout;
 import java.awt.Dimension;
 import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
 import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
 import java.net.URL;
 import javax.swing.ImageIcon;
 import javax.swing.JButton;
 import javax.swing.JFrame;
 import javax.swing.JPanel;
 import javax.swing.JScrollPane;
 import javax.swing.JTextArea;
 import javax.swing.JToolBar;
 import javax.swing.SwingUtilities;
 import javax.swing.UIManager;
 import javax.swing.plaf.metal.MetalLookAndFeel;
 import javax.swing.plaf.metal.OceanTheme;

 public class ToolBarDemo extends JPanel
                          implements ActionListener {
         protected JTextArea textArea;
         protected String newline = "\n";
static final private String PREVIOUS = "previous";
static final private String UP = "up";
static final private String NEXT = "next";

public ToolBarDemo() {
    super(new BorderLayout());

    //Create the toolbar.
    JToolBar toolBar = new JToolBar("Still draggable");
    addButtons(toolBar);

    //Create the text area used for output.  Request
    //enough space for 5 rows and 30 columns.
    textArea = new JTextArea(5, 30);
    textArea.setEditable(false);
    JScrollPane scrollPane = new JScrollPane(textArea);

    //Lay out the main panel.
    setPreferredSize(new Dimension(450, 130));
    add(toolBar, BorderLayout.PAGE_START);
    add(scrollPane, BorderLayout.CENTER);
}

protected void addButtons(JToolBar toolBar) {
    JButton button = null;

    //first button
    button = makeNavigationButton("Back24", PREVIOUS,
                                  "Back to previous something-or-other",
                                  "Previous");
    toolBar.add(button);

    //second button
    button = makeNavigationButton("Up24", UP,
                                  "Up to something-or-other",
                                  "Up");
    toolBar.add(button);

    //third button
    button = makeNavigationButton("Forward24", NEXT,
                                  "Forward to something-or-other",
                                  "Next");
    toolBar.add(button);
}

protected JButton makeNavigationButton(String imageName,
                                       String actionCommand,
                                       String toolTipText,
                                       String altText) {
    //Look for the image.
    String imgLocation = "images/"
                         + imageName
                         + ".gif";
    URL imageURL = ToolBarDemo.class.getResource(imgLocation);

    //Create and initialize the button.
    JButton button = new JButton();
    button.setActionCommand(actionCommand);
    button.setToolTipText(toolTipText);
    button.addActionListener(this);

    if (imageURL != null) {                      //image found
        button.setIcon(new ImageIcon(imageURL, altText));
    } else {                                     //no image found
        button.setText(altText);
        System.err.println("Resource not found: "
                           + imgLocation);
    }

    return button;
}

public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
    String cmd = e.getActionCommand();
    String description = null;

    // Handle each button.
    if (PREVIOUS.equals(cmd)) { //first button clicked
        description = "taken you to the previous <something>.";
    } else if (UP.equals(cmd)) { // second button clicked
        description = "taken you up one level to <something>.";
    } else if (NEXT.equals(cmd)) { // third button clicked
        description = "taken you to the next <something>.";
    }

    displayResult("If this were a real app, it would have "
                    + description);
}

protected void displayResult(String actionDescription) {
    textArea.append(actionDescription + newline);
    textArea.setCaretPosition(textArea.getDocument().getLength());
}

/**
 * Create the GUI and show it.  For thread safety,
 * this method should be invoked from the
 * event dispatch thread.
 */
private static void createAndShowGUI() {
    //Create and set up the window.
    JFrame frame = new JFrame("ToolBarDemo");
    frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);

    //Add content to the window.
    frame.add(new ToolBarDemo());

    //Display the window.
    frame.pack();
    frame.setVisible(true);
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    //Schedule a job for the event dispatch thread:
    //creating and showing this application's GUI.
    SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
        public void run() {
            setsLF();
        createAndShowGUI();
        }
    });
}

    /**
 *
 */
private static void setsLF() {
    try {
        UIManager.setLookAndFeel(UIManager.getCrossPlatformLookAndFeelClassName());
        MetalLookAndFeel.setCurrentTheme(new OceanTheme());
        UIManager.setLookAndFeel(new MetalLookAndFeel());
    } catch (ClassNotFoundException ex) {
        java.util.logging.Logger.getLogger(ToolBarDemo.class.getName()).log (java.util.logging.Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
    } catch (InstantiationException ex) {
        java.util.logging.Logger.getLogger(ToolBarDemo.class.getName()).log(java.util.logging.Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
    } catch (IllegalAccessException ex) {
        java.util.logging.Logger.getLogger(ToolBarDemo.class.getName()).log(java.util.logging.Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
    } catch (javax.swing.UnsupportedLookAndFeelException ex) {
        java.util.logging.Logger.getLogger(ToolBarDemo.class.getName()).log(java.util.logging.Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
    }
    JFrame.setDefaultLookAndFeelDecorated(Boolean.TRUE);
    return;
}

}

share|improve this question
    
Please look to increase that accept rate. –  Andrew Thompson Nov 22 '12 at 23:33
1  
+1 for the SSCCE - confirmed that the frame created on ripping off the toolbar is not lookAndFeelDecorated (aka: has the system title bar). Looks like a bug to me. –  kleopatra Nov 27 '12 at 16:44
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Looks like nowadays the toplevel container of the ripped of toolBar is of type JDialog, so you have the set the lafDecoration for that as well:

JFrame.setDefaultLookAndFeelDecorated(Boolean.TRUE);
JDialog.setDefaultLookAndFeelDecorated(true);

Works for jdk7 and vista, didn't test other environments.

share|improve this answer
    
Also validated correct for jdk7 with Windows 7 & Windows XP OSs. Many thanks kleopatra –  FRANCESC XAVIER DALMAU PUJOL Nov 28 '12 at 22:46
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I made a small project as you described:

public class LafTest
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        JFrame frame = new JFrame();
        frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.DISPOSE_ON_CLOSE);

        frame.setSize(500, 500);

        JPanel panel = new JPanel(new BorderLayout());
        JToolBar toolbar = new JToolBar();

        toolbar.add(new JButton("button1"));
        toolbar.add(new JButton("button2"));

        panel.add(toolbar, BorderLayout.PAGE_START);

        frame.add(panel);

        frame.setVisible(true);
    }
}

Works fine for me, all the time the JToolBar has Metal-LAF. (OS: Windows 7 x64, java version "1.7.0_09")

Please compare your code with this snippet. Propably you used the UIManager-class somewhere. If you still cannot fix this issue, you should post some of the used code and maybe some more details about your OS and the used Java version.

share|improve this answer
    
Hello,I've compared your project against my code and it is functionally the same.I do use UIManager class just before launching the main JFrame of the application in this way : UIManager.setLookAndFeel(UIManager.getCrossPlatformLookAndFeelClassName()); –  FRANCESC XAVIER DALMAU PUJOL Nov 24 '12 at 12:37
    
Hello,I've compared your project against my code and it is functionally the same.I do use UIManager class just before launching the main JFrame of the application in this way : UIManager.setLookAndFeel(UIManager.getCrossPlatformLookAndFeelClassName()); and JFrame.setDefaultLookAndFeelDecorated(Boolean.TRUE);. I assume these sentences will force java to use Metal L&F decarations for all windows (JToolBar, JDialog and so on). Is this correct?; if not what is the correct solution?. My OS is Windows XP. May anyone help me¡¡ –  FRANCESC XAVIER DALMAU PUJOL Nov 24 '12 at 12:46
    
Did you use UIManager before you create your JDialog? –  FrecherxDachs Nov 28 '12 at 12:57
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