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What am I missing? If I want to increment a counter in a separate function, why does it give me a segmentation fault?

int point(int *cow);

int main()
{
    int *cow = 0;
    point(cow);
    return(0);

}

int point(int *cow) {
    (*cow)++;
    return(0);
}
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Haven't done C in a while, but aren't you defining the pointer to a position 0 in memory, not defining the memory value as 0? –  Josh Mc Nov 22 '12 at 23:05

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Dereferencing a null pointer is undefined behavior in C.

Maybe you wanted to do this instead:

int a = 0;
int *cow = &a;

point(cow);

Note that the temporary pointer cow is not necessary and you can directly pass &a to point function.

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point(&a) would probably have sufficed... –  Kerrek SB Nov 22 '12 at 23:26

(Definition from wiki) A segmentation fault (often shortened to segfault), bus error or access violation is generally an attempt to access memory that the CPU cannot physically address.

int *cow = 0;

When program is trying to access memory pointed above, you are getting segmentation error because it is not valid address.

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int *cow = 0;

is declaring "cow" to be a pointer to an integer and then assigning that pointer the value zero. You then pass it to point() which tries to dereference "0" and then increment whatever value is stored at that memory location.

Try this instead:

int x = 0;
int *cow = &x;
point(cow);
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You are attempting to dereference a null pointer, which will certainly crash your program. You probably meant to do this:

int point(int *cow);

int main()
{
    int cow = 0;
    point(&cow);
    return(0);

}

int point(int *cow) {
    (*cow)++;
    return(0);
}

In your original code, you created a pointer-to-int (ie: int* cow), but you never actually created an int to store the value you are attempting to increment. The following is also a valid example that combines my code change above with your original code:

int point(int *cow);

int main()
{
    int cow = 0;
    int* pCow = &cow;
    point(pCow);
    return(0);

}

int point(int *cow) {
    (*cow)++;
    return(0);
}

Good luck!

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The good way to do this would be the following:

void point (int *cow);

int main () {
    int cow = 0; // Create a simple int, not a pointer
    point (&cow); // Pass address (&) of your int
    return 0;
}

void point (int *cow) {
    (*cow)++;
}

You don't need to have a pointer in your main, just pass the pointer to your increment function.

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