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I have a text file and am trying to extract the data in the first row (or line) of the file, where each data is saved as a list (so each point is saved on it's own line) in a new file.

example data.txt:

Name  Col  Samp1  Samp2  Samp3  Samp4  Samp5  Samp6
Car1  Red   49.3   43.2   54.3   52.3   12.5   76.8
Car2  Blu   56.3   12.4   85.4   67.1   24.5   32.5
and so on..

I would like a new list to look like this, and saved to a new file called samps.txt:

Samp1
Samp2
Samp3
Samp4
Samp5
Samp6

I am very new to shell scripting and could use all the help anyone can provide.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Read the first line into a variable

read -r FIRSTLINE < filename

Split the string into words

WORDS=( $FIRSTLINE )

Loop through the words and output them to a file

for WORD in ${WORDS[@]}
do
  echo $WORD >> outputfilename
done

In your case, you want to drop the first two column values. You can slice the array by using ${WORDS[@]:2 in your for statement. Alternative, you can test the values inside the for loop before echoing them to the file.

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Hi @Enrico. Thanks for your help thus far. I tried your suggestions, first by testing the values inside the loop, however nothing is printing. The script appears to run, as there are no errors, but I'm not getting the desired output. Any advice? –  Sheila Nov 22 '12 at 23:58
    
@ShilaP make sure you have run the first two commands to populate the WORDS array variable before running the for loop code. Otherwise the array is empty and it won't print anything –  Enrico Nov 23 '12 at 0:06
    
I've tried both –  Sheila Nov 23 '12 at 0:06
    
Yes I ran the first two lines first, and it doesn't seem like WORDS is populating? –  Sheila Nov 23 '12 at 0:08
    
let us continue this discussion in chat –  Enrico Nov 23 '12 at 0:12

This will do the trick:

$ head -1 data.txt | grep -o 'Samp[0-9]*'

Samp1
Samp2
Samp3
Samp4
Samp5
Samp6

Explanation:

  1. Display the first line of a file: head -1 data.txt

  2. | take the output of the last command and use it as input to the next (called piping).

  3. Print the matches of the given regex: grep -o 'Samp[0-9]*'

The regex 'Samp[0-9]*' will match any string that starts Samp followed by any digits.

To save the output to samps.txt use the redirection operator >:

$ head -1 data.txt | grep -o 'Samp[0-9]*' > samps.txt

This will work for any column headings not just ones that match 'Samp[0-9]*':

$ head -1 data.txt | grep -o '\w*' | tail -n +3 > samps.txt

grep -o '\w*' matches words and tail -n +3 displays all the lines starting at the 3rd line (i.e. not displaying the first two column headings).

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Use read -a to read the line into an array, and then use for to iterate over the array elements. See help for more details.

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You may find awk a valuable tool when processing text files with fields:

awk 'NR==1 { for(i=3;i<=NF;i++) print $i }' file

Results:

Samp1
Samp2
Samp3
Samp4
Samp5
Samp6

Explanation:

NR is short for the number of rows.
NF is short for the number of fields in the row.
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Just using bash:

set -- $(head -1 data.txt)       # save the words in the first line as $1,$2,...
shift 2                          # discard the first two words
printf '%s\n' "$@" > samps.txt   # print each remaining word on its own line
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I upvoted Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams' answer because it's the best option, using only pure bash. As he doesn't give a fully working example, here's one:

read -a samps < "myfile.txt"
printf "%s\n" "${samps[@]:2}"

Output:

Samp1
Samp2
Samp3
Samp4
Samp5
Samp6
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