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Here is a simplified version of my JS:

var myObject = function() {
    return {
        functionOne: function() {
            //some other logic here
        },
        functionTwo: function() {
            var self = this;
            //some logic here
            //then call functionOne
            self.functionOne();
        }
    };
}

Then I have this in the body of my html:

<a href="#" onclick="myObject.functionTwo()">click me</a>

Why do I get the error Uncaught TypeError: Object [some url] has no method 'functionOne', when I click the link?

share|improve this question
    
"has no method 'functionOne'"? You sure about that? You're trying to invoke functionTwo, which should fail. – I Hate Lazy Nov 22 '12 at 23:38
    
I have a feeling that you have (); at the end of your assignment, and you're trying to pass self.functionOne somewhere to be invoked. – I Hate Lazy Nov 22 '12 at 23:43
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The error that you're seeing doesn't reflect the example code you've shown.

That said, in the way that you're using the code, you should be able to reduce it to simply:

var myObject = {
    functionOne: function() {
    },
    functionTwo: function() {
        this.functionOne();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
myObject doesn't need to be invoked as a constructor. It just needs to be invoked. – I Hate Lazy Nov 22 '12 at 23:44
    
@user1689607 But if you just invoke it, this will reference window and that makes even less sense :) – Ja͢ck Nov 22 '12 at 23:47
    
But this isn't used anywhere in the myObject function. It just returns a plain object that has methods. Those methods have this, which will be a reference to the plain object if they're invoked from that object. So doing myObject().functionTwo() will work. – I Hate Lazy Nov 22 '12 at 23:49
    
@user1689607 Hmm, you're right. I kept thinking this should reference instances of myObject :) – Ja͢ck Nov 22 '12 at 23:58
    
You're right. I apologize; I got the wrong error message somehow. I made it simpler too :) Thanks! – Krummelz Nov 23 '12 at 0:02

Your myObject is a function that needs to be called in order to get that object

<a href="#" onclick="myObject().functionTwo()">click me</a>

Why not just define myObject as an object:

var myObject = {
    functionOne: function() {
        //some other logic here
    },
    functionTwo: function() {
        var self = this;
        //some logic here
        //then call functionOne
        self.functionOne();
    }
};
share|improve this answer

What you need is for your function to be executed immediately. Further to that your declarion of the self variable leads me to think that you are trying to create a closure so that you can access functionOne from functionTwo. If that is the case then I think the following is what you were after:

var myObject = (function() {

    function func1( ) {
    }

    function func2( ) {
        func1();
    }
    return {
        functionOne: func1,
        functionTwo: func2
    };
}());
share|improve this answer

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