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I'm having a little trouble calculating the number of "partial" combinations (not permutations) of some data stored in arrays. For simplicity's sake the data looks something like:

$test = array(
        array('1:1' => 'Option 1:1', '1:2' => 'Option 1:2', '1:3' => 'Option 1:3'),
        array('2:1' => 'Option 2:1', '2:2' => 'Option 2:2', '2:3' => 'Option 2:3'),
        array('3:1' => 'Option 3:1', '3:2' => 'Option 3:2', '3:3' => 'Option 3:3')
    );

but can have any number of arrays (up to 6) and each one can have between 2 and 20 options. Changing this format isn't really possible because it's legacy and is essentially used to power dropdowns (e.g. imagine a clothing store where array 1 is size, array 2 is colour and array 3 is material).

I have been using a simple recursive function (found on here earlier today) to calculate the Cartesian product:

$result = call_user_func_array('cartesian', $test);

function cartesian()
{
    $arrays = func_get_args();

    if(count($arrays) == 0)
    {
        return array(array());
    }

    $array      = array_shift($arrays);
    $recurse    = call_user_func_array(__FUNCTION__, $arrays);
    $return     = array();

    foreach($array as $key => $value)
    {
        foreach($recurse as $result)
        {
            $return[] = array_merge(array($key => $value), $result);
        }
    }

    return $return;
}

Which after a small amount of post processing:

$result = neaten($result);

function neaten($array_cartesian)
{   
    $names = array();

    foreach($array_cartesian as $array)
    {
        ksort($array);
        $config_string  = array();
        $name_string    = array();

        foreach($array as $config => $name)
        {
            $config_string[]    = $config;
            $name_string[]      = $name;
        }

        $names[implode(',', $config_string)] = implode(', ', $name_string);
    }

    return $names;
}

Produces something like:

Array
(
    [1:1,2:1,3:1] => Option 1:1, Option 2:1, Option 3:1
    [1:1,2:1,3:2] => Option 1:1, Option 2:1, Option 3:2
    [1:1,2:1,3:3] => Option 1:1, Option 2:1, Option 3:3
    [1:1,2:2,3:1] => Option 1:1, Option 2:2, Option 3:1
    [1:1,2:2,3:2] => Option 1:1, Option 2:2, Option 3:2
    [1:1,2:2,3:3] => Option 1:1, Option 2:2, Option 3:3
    [1:1,2:3,3:1] => Option 1:1, Option 2:3, Option 3:1
    [1:1,2:3,3:2] => Option 1:1, Option 2:3, Option 3:2
    [1:1,2:3,3:3] => Option 1:1, Option 2:3, Option 3:3
    [1:2,2:1,3:1] => Option 1:2, Option 2:1, Option 3:1
    [1:2,2:1,3:2] => Option 1:2, Option 2:1, Option 3:2
    [1:2,2:1,3:3] => Option 1:2, Option 2:1, Option 3:3
    [1:2,2:2,3:1] => Option 1:2, Option 2:2, Option 3:1
    [1:2,2:2,3:2] => Option 1:2, Option 2:2, Option 3:2
    [1:2,2:2,3:3] => Option 1:2, Option 2:2, Option 3:3
    [1:2,2:3,3:1] => Option 1:2, Option 2:3, Option 3:1
    [1:2,2:3,3:2] => Option 1:2, Option 2:3, Option 3:2
    [1:2,2:3,3:3] => Option 1:2, Option 2:3, Option 3:3
    [1:3,2:1,3:1] => Option 1:3, Option 2:1, Option 3:1
    [1:3,2:1,3:2] => Option 1:3, Option 2:1, Option 3:2
    [1:3,2:1,3:3] => Option 1:3, Option 2:1, Option 3:3
    [1:3,2:2,3:1] => Option 1:3, Option 2:2, Option 3:1
    [1:3,2:2,3:2] => Option 1:3, Option 2:2, Option 3:2
    [1:3,2:2,3:3] => Option 1:3, Option 2:2, Option 3:3
    [1:3,2:3,3:1] => Option 1:3, Option 2:3, Option 3:1
    [1:3,2:3,3:2] => Option 1:3, Option 2:3, Option 3:2
    [1:3,2:3,3:3] => Option 1:3, Option 2:3, Option 3:3
)

27 total

Which is great, and exactly what a Cartesian function should do. However, what I really need output is something like:

Array
(
    [1:1]       => Option 1:1
    [1:2]       => Option 1:2
    [1:3]       => Option 1:3
    [2:1]       => Option 2:1
    [2:2]       => Option 2:2
    [2:3]       => Option 2:3
    [3:1]       => Option 3:1
    [3:2]       => Option 3:2
    [3:3]       => Option 3:3
    [1:1,2:1]   => Option 1:1, Option 2:1
    [1:1,2:2]   => Option 1:1, Option 2:2
    [1:1,2:3]   => Option 1:1, Option 2:3
    [1:2,2:1]   => Option 1:2, Option 2:1
    [1:2,2:2]   => Option 1:2, Option 2:2
    [1:2,2:3]   => Option 1:2, Option 2:3
    [1:3,2:1]   => Option 1:3, Option 2:1
    [1:3,2:2]   => Option 1:3, Option 2:2
    [1:3,2:3]   => Option 1:3, Option 2:3
    [1:1,3:1]   => Option 1:1, Option 3:1
    [1:1,3:2]   => Option 1:1, Option 3:2
    [1:1,3:3]   => Option 1:1, Option 3:3
    [1:2,3:1]   => Option 1:2, Option 3:1
    [1:2,3:2]   => Option 1:2, Option 3:2
    [1:2,3:3]   => Option 1:2, Option 3:3
    [1:3,3:1]   => Option 1:3, Option 3:1
    [1:3,3:2]   => Option 1:3, Option 3:2
    [1:3,3:3]   => Option 1:3, Option 3:3
    [2:1,3:1]   => Option 2:1, Option 3:1
    [2:1,3:2]   => Option 2:1, Option 3:2
    [2:1,3:3]   => Option 2:1, Option 3:3
    [2:2,3:1]   => Option 2:2, Option 3:1
    [2:2,3:2]   => Option 2:2, Option 3:2
    [2:2,3:3]   => Option 2:2, Option 3:3
    [2:3,3:1]   => Option 2:3, Option 3:1
    [2:3,3:2]   => Option 2:3, Option 3:2
    [2:3,3:3]   => Option 2:3, Option 3:3
    [1:1,2:1,3:1]   => Option 1:1, Option 2:1, Option 3:1
    [1:1,2:1,3:2]   => Option 1:1, Option 2:1, Option 3:2
    [1:1,2:1,3:3]   => Option 1:1, Option 2:1, Option 3:3
    [1:1,2:2,3:1]   => Option 1:1, Option 2:2, Option 3:1
    [1:1,2:2,3:2]   => Option 1:1, Option 2:2, Option 3:2
    [1:1,2:2,3:3]   => Option 1:1, Option 2:2, Option 3:3
    [1:1,2:3,3:1]   => Option 1:1, Option 2:3, Option 3:1
    [1:1,2:3,3:2]   => Option 1:1, Option 2:3, Option 3:2
    [1:1,2:3,3:3]   => Option 1:1, Option 2:3, Option 3:3
    [1:2,2:1,3:1]   => Option 1:2, Option 2:1, Option 3:1
    [1:2,2:1,3:2]   => Option 1:2, Option 2:1, Option 3:2
    [1:2,2:1,3:3]   => Option 1:2, Option 2:1, Option 3:3
    [1:2,2:2,3:1]   => Option 1:2, Option 2:2, Option 3:1
    [1:2,2:2,3:2]   => Option 1:2, Option 2:2, Option 3:2
    [1:2,2:2,3:3]   => Option 1:2, Option 2:2, Option 3:3
    [1:2,2:3,3:1]   => Option 1:2, Option 2:3, Option 3:1
    [1:2,2:3,3:2]   => Option 1:2, Option 2:3, Option 3:2
    [1:2,2:3,3:3]   => Option 1:2, Option 2:3, Option 3:3
    [1:3,2:1,3:1]   => Option 1:3, Option 2:1, Option 3:1
    [1:3,2:1,3:2]   => Option 1:3, Option 2:1, Option 3:2
    [1:3,2:1,3:3]   => Option 1:3, Option 2:1, Option 3:3
    [1:3,2:2,3:1]   => Option 1:3, Option 2:2, Option 3:1
    [1:3,2:2,3:2]   => Option 1:3, Option 2:2, Option 3:2
    [1:3,2:2,3:3]   => Option 1:3, Option 2:2, Option 3:3
    [1:3,2:3,3:1]   => Option 1:3, Option 2:3, Option 3:1
    [1:3,2:3,3:2]   => Option 1:3, Option 2:3, Option 3:2
    [1:3,2:3,3:3]   => Option 1:3, Option 2:3, Option 3:3
)

63 total

With no permutations, just all partial combinations.

As far as I can tell this specific question hasn't been asked on here in php (though I have no idea what it is called to search for it, so apologies if it has). I would ask that no-one closes this question prematurely as a duplicate unless they understand what I am trying to achieve and the page linked to solves this EXACT problem (not this problem using strings or permutations or solved in another language for example).

The code: http://phpfiddle.org/main/code/2aw-awb

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
Probably the easiest way is to sort them and filter out the duplicates. –  AndreKR Nov 22 '12 at 23:43
    
    
fyi, for each of the elements in your cartesian array, you want to calc the power set of that elements members. well almost, you don't want the empty set as a result. –  goat Nov 23 '12 at 1:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A fellow Londoner! Is this what you're looking for?

http://phpfiddle.org/main/code/wy0-t6f

(Please excuse horrible structure, variable names, and other imperfections... it's extremely late.)

Method: get all possible combinations of sub-arrays from your original array, then run the cartesian and neaten functions on each of them. The resulting array should contain all possible permutations (but still needs to be sorted).

share|improve this answer
    
Perfect, I ran the power set function first and then the Cartesian product. I owe you a beer :-) –  Paul Norman Nov 23 '12 at 17:31

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