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I have an application that has a layout with ~150 editText's and a mainActivity that has an onClickListener for each of these editTexts, and a button which loops through them all and clears them.

The application was running fine, and without making any significant changes I am now getting the following logCat error everytime i start up the application:

Out of memory on a 2903056-byte allocation.

Is there any obvious bad practices I am doing here that is causing the memory loss?

Some of my code below as illustration (this is repeated many times obviously)

box0101.setOnTouchListener(new View.OnTouchListener() {
        @Override
        public boolean onTouch(View v, MotionEvent event) {
            txtHint.setText(hintPrefix + onOneClick);
            return false;
        }
    });
    box0301.setOnTouchListener(new View.OnTouchListener() {
        @Override
        public boolean onTouch(View v, MotionEvent event) {
            txtHint.setText(hintPrefix + onOneClick);
            return false;
        }
    });
    box0401.setOnTouchListener(new View.OnTouchListener() {
        @Override
        public boolean onTouch(View v, MotionEvent event) {
            txtHint.setText(hintPrefix + onOneClick);
            return false;
        }
    });
    box0501.setOnTouchListener(new View.OnTouchListener() {
        @Override
        public boolean onTouch(View v, MotionEvent event) {
            txtHint.setText(hintPrefix + onOneClick);
            return false;
        }
    });
    box0601.setOnTouchListener(new View.OnTouchListener() {
        @Override
        public boolean onTouch(View v, MotionEvent event) {
            txtHint.setText(hintPrefix + onOneClick);
            return false;
        }
    });

and also some buttonclick listeners that set off some loops

    btnClear.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {

        @Override
        public void onClick(View v) {
            clearBoard();               
        }
    });
    public void clearBoard() {
    final int ROW_COUNT = 14;
    final int COL_COUNT = 9;
    final String ROWS[] = {"01","02","03","04","05","06","07","08","09","10","11","12","13","14","15"};
    final String COLS[] = {"01","02","03","04","05","06","07","08","09","10"};

    for(int i=0; i<ROW_COUNT; i++) {
        for(int j=0; j<COL_COUNT; j++) {
            String a = ROWS[i];
            String b = COLS[j];
            int editTextId = getResources().getIdentifier("box" + a + b , "id", getPackageName());
            EditText et=(EditText)findViewById(editTextId);    
            et.setText("");
        }
    }
    }
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A 2903056 byte allocation is probably not caused by EditTexts - Use a memory profiler like MAT to check where your problem is. Also, a ListView or something like that, would not require that you have 150 box1234 variables in your code. –  zapl Nov 23 '12 at 0:48
2  
Try to use only one OnClickListener for all your EditText objects. Just put a switch-case inside and handle different callers(EditText) inside. It will eliminate 150 objects of View.OnClickListener(). Second, in eclipse do clean and re-build of your project. Sometimes eclips do strange things to your package so it acts weird. –  alex.veprik Nov 23 '12 at 0:49
    
I agree with @alex.veprik but I can't see why you would want that many in a single activity. I don't know what your program is so it may be valid but with that many it seems like a lot for a user to handle and harder to manage the code. If possible, you may consider splitting them up...just a thought –  codeMagic Nov 23 '12 at 2:43
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As @alex.veprik mentioned: try to use one OnClickListener, and assign it to all your EditText-objects. If you create a new OnClickListener for every EditText-object, although they all do the same, this will eat a lot of your memory.

Example)

View.OnTouchListener boxListener = new View.OnTouchListener() {
    @Override
    public boolean onTouch(View v, MotionEvent event) {
        txtHint.setText(hintPrefix + onOneClick);
        return false;
    }
});

//boxes is a list of all your boxes
for(int i=0; i < boxes.size(); i++) {
    boxes.get(i).setOnTouchListener(boxListener);
}

It might also be wise to put the creation of your EditText-objects in a loop, and to store only the list of all boxes in a member variable. So instead of having 150 variables, you now only need one for the list, while at the same time keeping all the references. (this doesn't affect your memory problem, but it's good code style)

List<EditText> boxes = new ArrayList<EditText>();
for (int i = 0; i < NBR_OF_BOXES; i++) {
    boxes.add(new EditText());
}

As @zapl recommended, it might also be good to use a memory profiler.

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Instead of having a onTouch() method for each EditText, use a switch statement to create a case for each EditText, using the EditText ID

public boolean onTouch(View v, MotionEvent event) {
        switch(v.getId())
        {
            case R.id.editTextID:
                //Do something, etc
        } 
        return false;
    }
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