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This is not c++11, this is c++03

PROBLEM

I have a class called decorator which should be able to add text to both ends of a message the user passes to it via operator<<.

For instance:

decorator dec( 
   "-> ",          // prefix
   "\n"            // suffix
);
dec << "the value is: " << 33;

This should output: -> the value is 33\n


MY IMPLEMENTATION

dec << "the value is"

When this code is processed, proxy operator<<( decorater & dec , const T & msg ) is called, decorater adds the prefix, treat the message and returns a temporary proxy object. This temporary object will be in charge of treating the rest of the chain.

temporary_proxy_object << 33

Now this code is processed, and the temporary object treats the integer via proxy operator<<(const proxy &, const T &). It also records the fact that it has been solicitated by operator<<. Finally it returns a temporary object, which is a copy of itself.

As there are no other message to treat, the last temporary object dies alone. As it has not been solicitated by operator<<, it calls a member function of decorater to let it know that it was the last object, the decorater happily appends the suffix.


MY GRIEVES

What I hate most about this implementation is that it relies on a compiler optimization:

proxy operator( const proxy & p, const T & msg )
{
   // some work here
   return proxy(p);
}

Nothing prevents the compiler from creating two temporary proxy objects, a first one within the function, a second one as the returned temporary. If it did that, then my implementation would be screwed up as the first temporary object would not be solicitated.


SOURCE CODE

#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>

class decorater;
class proxy
{
public:
    proxy( const decorater & creator ),
           proxy( const proxy & other );

    void solicitate() const
    {
        m_solicitated = true;
    }

    ~proxy();

    const decorater & getDecorater() const;


private:
    mutable bool m_solicitated;
    const decorater & m_creator;
};

class decorater
{
public:
    decorater( const std::string & prefix, const std::string & suffix )
        :m_ostr()
        ,m_prefix( prefix )
        ,m_suffix( suffix )
    {
    }

    template<typename T>
    proxy treat ( const T & msg ) const
    {
        m_ostr << msg;
        return proxy(*this);
    }

    void appendPrefix() const
    {
        m_ostr << m_prefix;
    }

    void appendSuffix() const
    {
        m_ostr << m_suffix;
    }

    void print()
    {
        std::cout << m_ostr.str();
    }

private:
    mutable std::ostringstream m_ostr;
    std::string m_prefix, m_suffix;
};

template <typename T>
proxy operator<<( decorater & dec , const T & msg )
{
    dec.appendPrefix();
    return dec.treat(msg);
}

proxy::proxy( const decorater & creator )
    :m_solicitated( false )
    ,m_creator( creator )
{
}

proxy::proxy( const proxy & other )
    :m_solicitated( false )
    ,m_creator( other.m_creator )
{
}

proxy::~proxy()
{
    if ( !m_solicitated )
        getDecorater().appendSuffix();
}

const decorater & proxy::getDecorater() const
{
    return m_creator;
}

template <typename T>
proxy operator<<( const proxy & p, const T & msg )
{
    p.getDecorater().treat(msg);
    p.solicitate();

    return p;
}

int main()
{
    decorater dec("-> ", "\n");
    dec << "the value is: " << 33;
    dec.print();
}
share|improve this question
    
If this concerns you greatly, is there a reason you're using a proxy object instead of modifying the decorator state and returning it by reference (the way iostream inserters work?) In any case...if you just want to create a proxy object and then pass it along, you could use a shared_ptr<proxy> (TR1 or boost)--copies would be cheap and it would clean up at the end. –  HostileFork Nov 23 '12 at 1:04
    
@HostileFork I don’t mind modifying the decorator state, actually this was what I did before I decided to use proxy objects. The problem with that solution is that I have no way to know when the last element of the chain has been processed. Said differently, I haven’t find a way to know when to append the "suffix" part. –  qdii Nov 23 '12 at 1:24

2 Answers 2

I think I'd use something similar to an ostream_iterator:

// surround_iterator.h
#if !defined(SURROUND_ITERATOR_H_)
#define  SURROUND_ITERATOR_H_
#include <ostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <string>

template <class T, class charT=char, class traits=std::char_traits<charT> >
class surround_ostream_iterator :
    public std::iterator<std::output_iterator_tag, void, void, void, void>
{
    std::basic_ostream<charT,traits> *os;
    std::basic_string<charT> prefix;
    std::basic_string<charT> suffix;

public:

    typedef charT char_type;
    typedef traits traits_type;
    typedef std::basic_ostream<charT, traits> ostream_type;

    surround_ostream_iterator(ostream_type &s)
        : os(&s)
    {}

    surround_ostream_iterator(ostream_type &os, std::basic_string<charT> const &p, std::basic_string<charT> const &s)
        : os(&os), 
          prefix(p),
          suffix(s)
    {}

    surround_ostream_iterator<T, charT, traits> &operator=(T const &item)
    {
        *os << prefix << item << suffix;
        return *this;
    }

    surround_ostream_iterator<T, charT, traits> &operator*() {
        return *this;
    }

    surround_ostream_iterator<T, charT, traits> &operator++() {
        return *this;
    }

    surround_ostream_iterator<T, charT, traits> &operator++(int) {
        return *this;
    }
};

#endif 

And a quick test program to show how it works:

#include "surround_iterator.h"
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>

int main() { 

    int vec[] = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8};

    std::copy(vec, vec+8, 
        surround_ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, "->", "\n"));
    return 0;
}

Result:

->1
->2
->3
->4
->5
->6
->7
->8

Nothing for [lack of] an optimizer to break, more idiomatic usage, and as the cherry on top, the code is a bit shorter and simpler as well.

share|improve this answer
    
I am sorry but I can’t quite see how this is a solution to my problem: if I read correctly surround_ostream would add a prefix and a suffix to a single item of type T. But my problem is to add those prefix and suffix to a chain of elements separated by <<. I am sorry if I missed something obvious. –  qdii Nov 23 '12 at 1:48
    
@qdii: No, just didn't make that clear in your question. To surround a chain of objects, I think I'd use a transaction class similar to the one I posted in a previous answer. –  Jerry Coffin Nov 23 '12 at 2:00

Returning your proxy object wrapped in a shared_ptr will get you there in a mechanical sense. Copies will be cheap, and the destructor will run when it the temporary object is no longer needed. Though exceptions throw a wrench into trying to use the destructor as a synchronizing point to do output work, instead of just cleaning up.

I think it sort of comes down to an issue of poor style if

a << "foo";
a << "bar";

...does something different than

a << "foo" << "bar";

It strikes me as better to use something like endl to mark the end of a run more explicitly, or to wrap in a transaction like @JerryCoffin suggests.

share|improve this answer

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