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I'm looking to detect internationalized domain names and local portions in email addresses, and would like to know if there is a quick and easy way to do this with regex or otherwise in Javascript.

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What about: !/[ -~]/? –  elclanrs Nov 23 '12 at 3:41
    
Why not flesh that out with an explanation of how it works and what it does in an answer? –  wwaawaw Nov 23 '12 at 3:43
1  
^^ Check my answer. –  elclanrs Nov 23 '12 at 3:49
3  
What do you mean by ASCII? Remember that NUL (\0), BEL (\7 - causes PC to beep), ESC (\033) are also valid ASCII characters but most would't consider them to be valid ASCII text. –  slebetman Nov 23 '12 at 4:13
    
@slebetman very fair point to add. –  wwaawaw Nov 23 '12 at 5:34
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try with this regex. It tests for all ascii characters that have some meaning in a string, from space 32 to tilde 126:

var ascii = /^[ -~]+$/;

if ( !ascii.test( str ) ) {
  // string has non-ascii characters
}

Edit: with tabs and newlines:

/^[ -~\t\n\r]+$/;
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1  
So tabs and newlines don't count as OK characters? –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 23 '12 at 4:58
    
@JonathanLeffler: Right... I added that case as well. –  elclanrs Nov 23 '12 at 5:12
    
@elclanrs I'm glad that you differentiated, though, because for many usecases they wouldn't be desired. –  wwaawaw Nov 23 '12 at 5:38
    
All Ascii characters have meanings, but not all of them are allowed or suitable in a particular context. The variable name ascii would be misleading here. –  Jukka K. Korpela Nov 23 '12 at 7:45
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This should do it...

var hasMoreThanAscii = /^[\u0-\u7f]*$/.test(str);

...also...

var hasMoreThanAscii = str
                       .split("")
                       .some(function(char) { char.charCodeAt(0) > 127 });
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Shouldn't the + be a *? This requires that the string has characters in it, but the empty string "" fulfills the OP's strict requirements: it doesn't have any non-ASCII characters in it. –  Jeff Nov 23 '12 at 3:50
    
@Jeff Good point, updated it. –  alex Nov 23 '12 at 3:51
    
If you change your .filter to .some, you can get rid of .length > 0 –  I Hate Lazy Nov 23 '12 at 3:52
    
@user1689607 True. I'll also get rid of a bit of browser support ;) –  alex Nov 23 '12 at 3:52
    
Nah, any browser that supports .filter(), supports .some(). They're both ES5 additions. :) –  I Hate Lazy Nov 23 '12 at 3:54
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charCodeAt can be used to get the character code at a certain position in a string.

function isAsciiOnly(str) {
    for (var i = 0; i < str.length; i++)
        if (str.charCodeAt(i) > 127)
            return false;
    return true;
}
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1  
Isn't the largest ASCII character 127? –  alex Nov 23 '12 at 3:41
    
My bad :) Thanks for the correction. –  Nathan Wall Nov 23 '12 at 3:42
    
Like this approach... –  wwaawaw Nov 23 '12 at 5:51
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