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I'm writing a short text token replacement system which takes the form:

$varName(opt1|opt2|opt3)

It's designed to easily swap out things based on arbitrary values like this:

$gender(he|she)

I figured the best way to get and process those was a regex that matches the pattern but i can't figure out how to recognise the options between the brackets because they can repeat an arbitrary number of times and may not have as many pipe characters as options.

Any help?

(I'm using C# as the regex host)

EDIT:

I tried this but it only seems to work with something with 2 options

\$[a-zA-Z]+\(([a-zA-Z]+\|)+[a-zA-Z]+\)
share|improve this question

Something like this should work:

string text = "$gender(he|she|it|alien)";
string pattern = @"\$(\w+)\(([\w\|]*)\)";
Match match = Regex.Match(text, pattern);

string varName = match.Groups[1].Value;
string[] values = match.Groups[2].Value.Split('|');

Console.WriteLine(varName + ": ");
foreach (string value in values)
{
    Console.WriteLine("  " + value);
}

This is what it prints out:

gender:
  he
  she
  it
  alien

varName has the name of the variable, and then values is an array of strings containing each option.

However, if you put in something like "$gender()" with no values, or "$gender(he|she|)" with an extra pipe on the end, you'll get empty strings in the result. If that might be a problem, try this:

string[] values = match.Groups[2].Value.Split('|').Where((s) => !string.IsNullOrEmpty(s)).ToArray();
share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I figured it out.

I was forgetting to account for numbers in the options.

\$[a-zA-Z]+\(([a-zA-Z0-9]+\|)+[a-zA-Z0-9]+\)
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