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I'm using DataMapper to manage a database that has points of interest (POIs) located by latitude and longitude. I would like to do a query and find all POIs within x distance of a given latitude and longitude. For example, all POIs within 1000m of latitude 45, longitude 90.

I set this up:

class POI
  include DataMapper::Resource
  property :id,                  String,  :key => true
  property :title,               String,  :required => true
  property :lat,                 Float,   :required => true
  property :lon,                 Float,   :required => true

  def distance(latitude, longitude)
    # Taken from https://github.com/almartin/Ruby-Haversine
    earthRadius = 6371 # Earth's radius in km

    # convert degrees to radians
    def convDegRad(value)
      unless value.nil? or value == 0
        value = (value/180) * Math::PI
      end
      return value
    end

    deltaLat = (self.lat - latitude)
    deltaLon = (self.lon - longitude)
    deltaLat = convDegRad(deltaLat)
    deltaLon = convDegRad(deltaLon)

    # Calculate square of half the chord length between latitude and longitude
    a = Math.sin(deltaLat/2) * Math.sin(deltaLat/2) +
      Math.cos((self.lat/180 * Math::PI)) * Math.cos((latitude/180 * Math::PI)) *
      Math.sin(deltaLon/2) * Math.sin(deltaLon/2);
    # Calculate the angular distance in radians
    c = 2 * Math.atan2(Math.sqrt(a), Math.sqrt(1-a))

    distance = earthRadius * c
    return distance
  end
end

I'd like to be able to find records with a call similar to this:

pois = POI.all(distance(45,90).lte => 1000)

But that gives an error:

./poi-provider.rb:44:in `<main>': undefined method `distance' for main:Object (NoMethodError)

I read dkubb's answer about defining complex queries in a method but this is different because I need to pass parameters in and I'm trying to use the method as a condition.

How can I do that---or, is there a better way to use DataMapper to find points near a given latitude and longitude without breaking down and just using raw SQL?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
  1. You're calling an instance method without instantiating. That's what is causing your error.
  2. You can't use DataMapper methods as conditions. This means you're going to have to write some SQL.

Something like:

class POI
  ...
  def self.all_within_distance(distance, longitude, latitude)
    repository.adapter.query "SELECT *
    FROM pois 
    WHERE " + distance.to_s + " > ** Complicated math coded in SQL that gets uses poi.lon and poi.lat to get the distance from the given longitude and latitude ** " 
  end

Then call

POI.all_within_distance(1000, 45, 90)
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Whenever you're dealing with latitudes and longitudes, I would very strongly recommend that you use a spatial database rather than just two Float columns. Otherwise your queries will become crazily slow as soon as you have more than a trivial quantity of data.

MySQL does have spatial extensions, but the de facto standard for open-source spatial databases is the PostGIS extension to Postgres. Fortunately, you can use this with DataMapper fairly easily.

Installing

You'll need the dm-postgis plugin. The main code appears to be abandonware, but someone has updated it to work with current DataMapper. Clone dm-postgis from github, apply this pull request, and then gem install from the local directory.

You'll also find life easier if you install dm-ar-finders, which lets you use SQL queries and get DataMapper objects back.

Data model

You can then define your co-ordinate property as a PostGIS geometry type like this:

property :location, PostGISGeometry

and set it this way:

location=GeoRuby::SimpleFeatures::Point.from_x_y(longitude,latitude)

You'll probably want to create an index on your location column. Rather than Postgres's default B-tree, you want a GIST index for geographic data. dm-postgis unfortunately isn't smart enough to create this, so do it from the psql command line:

CREATE INDEX index_poi_location ON poi USING GIST (location);

The proximity query

Ok. So now you have a location field. How do you run your proximity query?

The key is PostGIS's ST_DWithin function. As the docs say, this "returns true if the geometries are within the specified distance of one another". So in your case, you'd do something like this:

POI.find_by_sql "SELECT id,name FROM pois WHERE ST_DWithin(location, ST_GeomFromText('POINT(45 90)') , 0.05 )"

The 0.05 is the distance required. Note that this is in degrees, not metres. (Talking about projections and SRIDs is way beyond the scope of this answer, but if, for example, all your data was in the UK, you could use the OSGB projection and get metres pretty easily. Alternatively, someone could improve dm-postgis to cope with PostGIS geographies as well as geometries, which cope with metre distances natively. It's on my list... one day.)

The really great thing about all this is that PostGIS puts much more complex geographical queries within your grasp. For example, in a project I'm currently working on, I'm using it like this:

    shops=Shop.find_by_sql [<<-EOS,route.id]
        SELECT listings.id, listings.name, listings.provides
          FROM listings
          JOIN routes ON ST_DWithin(listings.location, routes.linestring, 0.05)
         WHERE routes.id=? AND type='Shop'
      ORDER BY ST_Line_Locate_Point(routes.linestring, listings.location)
    EOS

That finds all the shops along a particular route (a polyline) and orders them start-to-finish... and does it remarkably quickly.

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