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This was a take home test question (which I mailed 20 minutes ago if Prof. Gruhn is ruthlessly scouring stackoverflow). First computer science course, Intro using Python. Using the book "Starting Out With Python 2nd Ed." The test was basically on creating our own module libraries, reading and writing to a file, and try/except logic.

The first part asked to create a lottery mumber simulator. One that generated nonunique numbers, the other unique, non repeating numbers. Every answer I saw on here utilized lists, which is sadly the next chapter, and we were expressly forbidden from using them.

My code for this section:

import random

def ballPickerOne():
    a = random.randint(1, 59)
    b = random.randint(1, 59)
    c = random.randint(1, 59)
    d = random.randint(1, 59)
    e = random.randint(1, 59)
    f = random.randint(1, 35)

    showNumbers(a,b,c,d,e,f)


def ballPickerTwo():
   a = random.randrange(1,59,2)
   b = random.randrange(1,59,3)
   c = random.randrange(1,59,5)
   d = random.randrange(1,59,7)
   e = random.randrange(1,59,11)
   f = random.randint(1,35)

   showNumbers(a,b,c,d,e,f)


def showNumbers(a,b,c,d,e,f):

   print("Your Numbers ...")
   print()
   print("Ball 1: ", a)
   print("Ball 2: ", b)
   print("Ball 3: ", c)
   print("Ball 4: ", d)
   print("Ball 5: ", e)
   print("Red Ball: ", f)
   print()
   print("Good Luck")

We were required to use the showNumbers function to display the results, and in the format that would result from it. ballPickerTwo is the "unique" one, which I used prime number intervals in a failed attempt at uniqueness. I toyed with using a loop, but couldn't figure out how to display the numbers generated using showNumbers.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is a really tedious way of doing it, but it doesn't use lists. It will pick random and unique values.

def ballPickerTwo():

    a = random.randint(1, 59)

    b = a        
    while b == a:
        b = random.randint(1, 59)

    c = b
    while c == b or c == a:
        c = random.randint(1, 59)

    d = c
    while d == c or d == b or d == a:
        d = random.randint(1, 59)

    ...
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Ah, I was going to do that, but my professor usually isn't one for tedium, so I was convinced there was some way to do it with a range. This was originally supposed to be a 3 hour test in class, but he realized that it was way too long. Maybe this was part of it. –  Zachary Matthew Perry Nov 23 '12 at 5:33

Just return the values you have generated - use return in your functions. E.g.:

def ballPickerOne():
    a = random.randint(1, 59)
    b = random.randint(1, 59)
    c = random.randint(1, 59)
    d = random.randint(1, 59)
    e = random.randint(1, 59)
    f = random.randint(1, 35)
    return a,b,c,d,e,f

showNumbers(a,b,c,d,e,f)

What if:

from random import sample, randint

def ballPickerOne():
    a,b,c,d,e = sample(range(1,59), 5) 
    f = randint(1,35)
    while f!=a and f!=b and f!=c and f!=d and f!=e:
        f = randint(1,35)
    return a,b,c,d,e,f
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I think there may be an indentation problem in the question, rather than a real issue. I suspect the call to showNumbers is inside the ballPicker functions. –  Blckknght Nov 23 '12 at 4:57
    
@Blckknght than why he mentioned that he has a problem with using showNumbers –  Artsiom Rudzenka Nov 23 '12 at 5:11
    
I indented showNumbers wrong, it's supposed to be used to display the numbers from both ballPickerOne and Two, hence my conflict. –  Zachary Matthew Perry Nov 23 '12 at 5:42

How about use an integer as the bitmap to check unique?

import random

def showNumbers(a,b,c,d,e,f):
   print("Your Numbers ...")
   print()
   print("Ball 1: ", a)
   print("Ball 2: ", b)
   print("Ball 3: ", c)
   print("Ball 4: ", d)
   print("Ball 5: ", e)
   print("Red Ball: ", f)
   print()
   print("Good Luck")

def ballPickerTwo():
    while True:
        a = random.randint(1, 59)
        b = random.randint(1, 59)
        c = random.randint(1, 59)
        d = random.randint(1, 59)
        e = random.randint(1, 59)
        f = random.randint(1, 35)
        m = 2**a + 2**b + 2**c + 2**d + 2**e + 2**f
        if bin(m).count("1") == 6:
            break
    showNumbers(a,b,c,d,e,f)
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This works certainly, but I have no idea what a bin is. The particular chapter just introduced .random, .randint, and .uniform from the random library. I suspect he was giving a callback to boolean logic and the first guy who answered is what we'll get back. –  Zachary Matthew Perry Nov 23 '12 at 5:48

This is similar to HYRY's answer in that it is using the bits in a number to remember which numbers have been selected already. This works because Python can handle arbitrarily large numbers.

import random

def showNumbers(a, b, c, d, e, f):
   print("Your Numbers ...")
   print()
   print("Ball 1: ", a)
   print("Ball 2: ", b)
   print("Ball 3: ", c)
   print("Ball 4: ", d)
   print("Ball 5: ", e)
   print("Red Ball: ", f)
   print()
   print("Good Luck")

def pick(cur_val):
    while True:
        v = random.randint(1, 59)
        m = 2**v
        if (cur_val & m) == 0: # bit not set, v never picked before
            return (cur_val | m), v  # return updated cur_val and bit number now set in it

def ballPickerTwo():
    cur_val = 0
    cur_val, a = pick(cur_val)
    cur_val, b = pick(cur_val)
    cur_val, c = pick(cur_val)
    cur_val, d = pick(cur_val)
    cur_val, e = pick(cur_val)
    cur_val, f = pick(cur_val)

    showNumbers(a, b, c, d, e, f)
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