Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm relatively new to C#, so if the answer to this question is obvious I apologise.

There's a portion of a program I am writing that stores an array of structs, and one of the elements of the struct is a curried function.

The following is the portion of code causing the problem (minimised as far as I am able)

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace CurryingProblem
{
    class Program
    {
        public struct Value
        {
            public Func<decimal> Output;
        }
        public static decimal AddOne(decimal value)
        {
            return value + 1;
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Dictionary<string, Decimal> ThingsToAdd = new Dictionary<string, decimal>();
            Dictionary<string, Value> ThingsToPrint = new Dictionary<string, Value>();

            ThingsToAdd.Add("One", 1.0m);
            ThingsToAdd.Add("Two", 2.0m);
            foreach (KeyValuePair<string, Decimal> thing in ThingsToAdd)
            {
                Value value = new Value();
                value.Output = () => AddOne(thing.Value);
                ThingsToPrint.Add(thing.Key, value);
            }
            Console.WriteLine(ThingsToPrint["One"].Output());
            Console.WriteLine(ThingsToPrint["Two"].Output());

            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}

The expected output of this program is

2.0
3.0

But the actual output is

3.0
3.0

Any direction as to where I've gone wrong would be wonderful.

share|improve this question
2  
Really? Because my copy-and-paste produces 2.0 and 3.0... –  Simon Whitehead Nov 23 '12 at 5:23
    
Yep, mine definitely produces the wrong values. I'm running Visual Studio 2008, .NET 3.5 SP1, if this ends up being version dependant –  JamesL Nov 23 '12 at 5:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your question is similar to access to modified closure. This article by Eric Lippert explains it very well. You need to pass variable of local scope instead of passing loop thing.Value. Create a new variable and assign thing.Value to it so that local copy is passed.

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Dictionary<string, Decimal> ThingsToAdd = new Dictionary<string, decimal>();
        Dictionary<string, Value> ThingsToPrint = new Dictionary<string, Value>();

        ThingsToAdd.Add("One", 1.0m);
        ThingsToAdd.Add("Two", 2.0m);
        foreach (KeyValuePair<string, Decimal> thing in ThingsToAdd)
        {
            Value value = new Value();
            Decimal d = thing.Value;
            value.Output = () => AddOne(d);
            ThingsToPrint.Add(thing.Key, value);
        }
        Console.WriteLine(ThingsToPrint["One"].Output());
        Console.WriteLine(ThingsToPrint["Two"].Output());

        Console.ReadKey();
    }
share|improve this answer
    
This definitely works, thanks. I think this boils down to me not understanding the subtleties of scope. –  JamesL Nov 23 '12 at 5:31
    
I found this article very good for understanding blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2009/11/12/… –  Adil Nov 23 '12 at 5:41
    
+1 for explanation. –  Asif Mushtaq Nov 23 '12 at 5:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.