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To initialize an int array with all zeros, do I need to use:

int foo[10] = {0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0};

Or, will this work:

int foo[10] = {0};
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4 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted
int foo[10] = {0};

This is very fine :)


Note that if you do the following:

int foo[10] = {1};

Only the first element of the array will be initialized with the non-zero number whereas the rest will be initialized with zeros.

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@digitalross If you don't initialize an auto aggregate at all, then yes it shall contain garbage. The question is what if you initialize an aggregate with {0} either it is an auto or it isn't. –  AraK Aug 30 '09 at 1:24
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In C/C++ if you initialize just the first element of an array of known size with a value, the remainder will be zero-filled, so:

int foo[10] = {0};

will do exactly what you want.

This also works for structs:

struct bar {
    int x;
    int y;
    char c;
} myBar = {0};

will initialize all members to 0.

The standard (C99 - 6.7.8/12 - Initialization) says this:

If there are fewer initializers in a brace-enclosed list than there are elements or members of an aggregate, or fewer characters in a string literal used to initialize an array of known size than there are elements in the array, the remainder of the aggregate shall be initialized implicitly the same as objects that have static storage duration.

In C the grammar requires that there be at least one 'assignment-expression' inside the braces. An 'assignment-expression' can be many things from a constant or identifier up through much more complex expressions. However, an empty string doesn't qualify as an 'assignment-expression', so there has to be something between the braces.

In C++, the grammar specifically allows the '{ }' initializer, so the following would also zero-initialize the array:

int foo[10] = {};

It's probably also worth noting that in C++ the entries that don't have a specific initializer value in the initialize list will be 'value-initialized' or 'default-initialized' which might be different than being zero-initialized depending on what the constructors for the variable type are and whether the compiler is following the C++98 standrad or the C++03 standard (this is probably the only difference of any significance between C++98 and C++03). The whole situation with value vs. default initialization is rather complicated, so if you're interested see this answer: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/620137/syntax-of-new/620402#620402.

Fortunately, the difference doesn't seem to cause much trouble in practice, although if you run into it, it would proabbly cause some head scratching for a while when trying to figure out what the behavior really should be. I usually don't really think much about it - it makes my head hurt.

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From that rule it should follow that even int foo[10] = {}; is enough for an array of 10 zeros. –  UncleBens Aug 29 '09 at 21:30
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@UncleBens - in C the grammar requires that there be at least one 'assignment-expression', which can be many things from a constant or identifier up through a more complex expression. However, an empty string doesn't qualify as an 'assignment-expression', so there has to be something between the braces. The C++ grammar specifically allows the '{ }' initializer. –  Michael Burr Aug 29 '09 at 21:46
1  
@digitalross: this is covered by the paragraph "If there are fewer initializers ... the remainder of the aggregate shall be initialized implicitly the same as objects that have static storage duration." –  Michael Burr Aug 30 '09 at 3:41
    
C99 standard disallows {}. C++11 standard allows {}. gcc with -std=c99 allows {}. gcc with -pedantic disallows {}. –  Jingguo Yao Aug 10 '12 at 6:21
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all elements not mentioned in the initializer will be initializes to that types zero value where applicable.

So int foo[10] = {0}; is fine, the remaining elements not mentioned will also be 0

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Wow, C kind of seems to be simple, but even after years of citing the specification it's amazing how something new can still turn up.

I just looked it up in the first edition spec (ANSI/ISO 9899-1990) and, sure enough, the remainder of an auto aggregate is specified (6.5.7) "If there are fewer ... initialized implicitly...".

So: Anything non-auto. Always 0 (or, as initialized) whether initialized or not. Auto: completely initialized if you initialize any elements at all, otherwise, not initialized.

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@digitalross: You are wrong. If you leave locals completely uninitialized, it'll be uninitialized. If you use an initializer and initialize any one of fields, every field will be initialized. –  LeakyCode Aug 30 '09 at 1:34
    
+1 for correcting your answer :) –  AraK Aug 30 '09 at 16:42
    
Heh, thank you! –  DigitalRoss Aug 30 '09 at 19:49
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