Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider this HTML with CSS classes aa, bb and cc:

<div class='aa'>
<div class='bb'>
<div class='cc'>
</div>
</div>
</div>

I can select the class=cc tag like so: .aa > .bb > .cc. However, in my case, sometimes the .bb tag is absent, that is, the HTML looks like so:

<div class='aa'>
<div class='cc'>
</div>
</div>

Thererfore, to select all .cc close to an .aa, I'd need to specify two CSS paths:

.aa > .bb > .cc,
.aa > .cc { .... }

This works, but, is there no shorter way? Something similar to this:

.aa > (.bb >)? .cc { ... }   /* ? means "optional" */

with CSS or something like Stylus or LESS?

Motivation: In the real world, "aa" and "bb" and "cc" are somewhat longer names, and there's more stuff before and after the "aa" and "cc", and it'd be nice to not need to duplicate that stuff.

Please note: In my case, this won't work: .aa .cc because that'd match too many .ccs elsewhere on the page. The .ccs need to be either immediately below the .aa, or below .aa > .bb.

share|improve this question
3  
If .aa .cc is too general because you don't want to match .cc elements that are more distant descendants of .aa elements, then I think the .aa > .bb > .cc, .aa > .cc selector you already mentioned is best. –  nnnnnn Nov 23 '12 at 6:16
1  
In standard CSS there is no other way. –  BoltClock Nov 23 '12 at 6:53
    
Are .bb and .cc the only two possible children of .aa? –  BoltClock Nov 23 '12 at 17:26
    
@BoltClock No, .aa has other children too. (What did you have in mind, if the answer had been yes?) –  KajMagnus Nov 23 '12 at 22:59
    
I would have suggested .aa > .cc, .aa > * > .cc. Doesn't do much, but it would allow you to skip typing .bb... –  BoltClock Nov 24 '12 at 2:11
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

For Stylus and Sass you could do this (live example for Sass):

.aa
  > .bb, &
    > .cc
      width: 10px

I couldn't find a way to do so in a one-liner for Sass, but for Less/Stylus/Scss you could do also this (live examples for Scss, for Less) :

.aa { > .bb, & { > .cc {
  width: 10px
}}}

This is not that pretty also, but still better than nothing :)

share|improve this answer
    
I almost thought it was not possible! Thanks :-) –  KajMagnus Nov 28 '12 at 4:52
add comment

if you want use your option, by the way is very interesting, you can use a form most correct:

>.aa (>.bb)? >.cc { ... }

but the form correct would:

.aa .cc { ... }

into stylus:

.aa   
  .cc

thats all.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer, and I don't really understand it. I don't realize what you mean with "you can use a form most correct" Are you saying that .aa (>.bb)? >.cc { ... } is valid CSS? (I don't think it is) –  KajMagnus Jun 28 '13 at 3:12
add comment

Wouldn't .aa > .cc, .aa > .bb > .cc {} work? Or did I misunderstand your question?
This selects only the .cc that are direct .aa children and the .cc that are .bb children (children of .aa) as well.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes it'd work, but I was wondering if there's a shorter alternative. –  KajMagnus Nov 23 '12 at 6:13
    
(I updated the question to clarify why I'm asking.) –  KajMagnus Nov 23 '12 at 6:24
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.