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I found the following implementation in a code base I am going through

Interface IOrder
{
GetSubmittedOrder();
CreateOrder();
GetExistingOrder();
}

Class Order : IOrder
{
BuildSpecialOrder();
AddSpecialOrderParameters();
IOrder.GetSubmittedOrder();
IOrder.CreateOrder();
IOrder.GetExistingOrder();
}

Now, when we want to access the last three methods from this Order object, we need to do the following declaration

IOrder objOrder = new Order();

What is the reason(advantages) for creating an implementation like this? Does this practice have a specific name?

Note: Please let me know if this is a better fit at programmers.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would say that that's the incorrect usage of explicit interface implementation. It basically means that the methods are not visible in the public class contract. That's why you have to cast the object to the interface type first (you are using an implicit cast). You could also have done:

var order = (IOrder)order;
order.GetExistingOrder();

It's normally used when the class method collides with an interface method or when a class implements two interfaces with the same method (but different purposes).

It should be used with care since it can indicate that your class have a too large responsibility (and should be divided into smaller classes).

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3  
A third use scenario is when you need to implement the interface, but you don't want to support one of the methods in that interface. For example, System.Array implements ICollection, but the Add method throws an NotSupportedException because arrays are fixed-sized. It is therefore natural to not implement Add with an ordinary public method (since it's a method that always throws). –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Nov 23 '12 at 6:23
1  
It's not wrong. It's just not how you typically use explicit interface implementation. To me it looks like the developer making the class is unsure of if the class should implement that interface or not (since he hides the methods) –  jgauffin Nov 23 '12 at 6:27
1  
Or simply when you don't want interface methods polluting the public face of the hosting class. –  dthorpe Nov 23 '12 at 6:27
3  
@JeppeStigNielsen: That's a violation of the Liskovs Substitution Principle (but still probably the best way to do it if you really have to). –  jgauffin Nov 23 '12 at 6:28
1  
@jgauffin Sure it violates Liskov! But the BCL uses it. (But it is from IList, not ICollection.) –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Nov 23 '12 at 6:33

Its called explicit interface implementation.

It is used to differentiate the implementation of specific interface in case multiple interface are implemented have the colliding names of methods.

interface IOrder
{
  GetSubmittedOrder();
  CreateOrder();
  GetExistingOrder();
}

interface ISpecificOrder
{
  GetSubmittedOrder();
  CreateOrder();
  GetExistingOrder();
}

Class Order : IOrder, ISpecificOrder
{
  BuildSpecialOrder();
  AddSpecialOrderParameters();

  IOrder.GetSubmittedOrder();
  IOrder.CreateOrder();
  IOrder.GetExistingOrder();

  ISpecificOrder.GetSubmittedOrder();
  ISpecificOrder.CreateOrder();
  ISpecificOrder.GetExistingOrder();

}
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Incorrect. The same class method can be used to implement all interface methods with the same name. That's the default behavior. –  jgauffin Nov 23 '12 at 6:24
    
This example makes it very clear to me, Asif. Thanks. –  TheSilverBullet Nov 23 '12 at 6:26
    
@jgauffin Yes you are right. One should choose explicit interface implementation in case you want different behavior for different interfaces. –  Asif Mushtaq Nov 23 '12 at 6:29
    
@asif: don't you mean explicit? –  jgauffin Nov 23 '12 at 6:30
    
@jgauffin yes explicit :) –  Asif Mushtaq Nov 23 '12 at 6:31

Consider adapter pattern Wiki - Adapter pattern
When communicating with other application or part of app (and many other requirements), you dont want to bind the type as it will be decided on run time, you can use this type of object declaration. this will create the object of interface type but will allocate memory of required type(nested in switch case or returned by other function).

 IOrder objOrder = new Order();

Another thing mentioned in question is about implicit and explicit implementation of interface. Both can be used in different scenario. You can find more details from google.

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