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If I have an interface such as:

using System.Threading.Tasks;

...

public interface IFoo
{
  Task doIt();

  Task<bool> doItAndReturnStuff();
}

and one of the classes implementing this interface just happens to not require async methods, how can i correct override these functions?

In other words, how do I correctly return "void" and "bool" wrapped in Task objects?

For example:

public class FooHappensToNotNeedAsync : IFoo
{
  public override Task doIt()
  {
    // If I don't return anything here, I get
    // error that not all code paths return a value.
    // Can I just return null?
  }

  public override Task<bool> doItAndReturnStuff()
  {
    // If I want to return true, how to I do it?
    // This doesn't work:
    return true;
  }
}

NOTE - I can't strip the Task stuff completely because some of the classes that implement this interface are in fact asynch.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
return Task.Run(()=>true); –  L.B Nov 23 '12 at 7:34
1  
@L.B: That creates extra work for no real reason, and is less predictable than returning a task which has already completed. –  Jon Skeet Nov 23 '12 at 7:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 11 down vote accepted

It's not clear what you're trying to achieve, but one approach (which would look the most like "normal" code) is probably just to make them async methods anyway:

public async Task DoIt()
{
    // No-op
}

public async Task<bool> DoItAndReturnStuff()
{
    return true;
}

Without any await expressions, the method will complete synchronously anyway. You'll get a warning on each method, but you could disable that just for this piece of code using a #pragma.

Alternatively - and I guess more simply in terms of not requiring a #pragma to disable warnings - would be to use Task.FromResult:

public Task DoIt()
{
    // Returns a Task<bool>, but that's okay - it's still a Task
    return Task.FromResult(true);
}

public Task<bool> DoItAndReturnStuff()
{
    return Task.FromResult(true);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your first code snippet above - "probably just to make them async methods anyway" - will not compile. That is why I am asking this question. You will get "error CS0161: not all code paths return a value". I guess that's why you had a little snarky comment in there :). HOWEVER, your second snippet, especially the DoIt() implementation, is exactly the kind of hack I was looking for. Many thanks! –  swinefeaster Nov 23 '12 at 7:55
1  
@swinefeaster: The first version really should compile, if you've included the async modifier. Are you sure you did? Will double check when I'm back at a computer. –  Jon Skeet Nov 23 '12 at 7:58
1  
@swinefeaster: I just tried it, and it's fine - although I had to remove the override as it's implementing an interface, not overriding a base class method. I only get CS0161 without the async modifier. –  Jon Skeet Nov 23 '12 at 8:08
    
ah, you are right! i was missing the async modifier. cheers! –  swinefeaster Nov 23 '12 at 8:12
    
Dang, but then I get the following warning: "This async method lacks 'await' operators and will run synchronously. Consider using the 'await' operator to await non-blocking API calls, or 'await Task.Run(...)' to do CPU-bound work on a background thread." –  swinefeaster Nov 23 '12 at 8:46

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