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I'm trying to improve my multiprocess application by using shared memory to communicate. I was doing some profiling with simple tests and something strange came out. When I'm trying to copy the data stored in the SharedMemory, it's faster with ReadProcessMemory than with Memcopy.

I know I'm not supposed to use SharedMemory that way (it's better to read straight inside the shared memory), but I'm still wondering why is this happening. By pursuing my investigation further, another thing showed up : if I do 2 consecutive memcpy on the same shared memory area (in fact, the same region), the second copy is twice faster than the first.

Here is a sample code showing the problem. In this example, there is only one process but the problem is stil here. Doing a memcpy from the shared memory region is slower than doing a ReadProcessMemory of that same area on my own process !

#include <tchar.h>
#include <basetsd.h>
#include <iostream>

#include <boost/interprocess/mapped_region.hpp>
#include <boost/interprocess/windows_shared_memory.hpp>
#include <time.h>
namespace bip = boost::interprocess;
#include <boost/asio.hpp>

 bip::windows_shared_memory* AllocateSharedMemory(UINT32 a_UI32_Size)
{
    bip::windows_shared_memory* l_pShm = new bip::windows_shared_memory (bip::create_only, "Global\\testSharedMemory", bip::read_write, a_UI32_Size);
    bip::mapped_region l_region(*l_pShm, bip::read_write);
    std::memset(l_region.get_address(), 1, l_region.get_size());
    return l_pShm;
}

//Copy the shared memory with memcpy
void CopySharedMemory(UINT32 a_UI32_Size)
{
    bip::windows_shared_memory m_shm(bip::open_only, "Global\\testSharedMemory", bip::read_only);
    bip::mapped_region l_region(m_shm, bip::read_only);
    void* l_pData = malloc(a_UI32_Size);
    memcpy(l_pData, l_region.get_address(), a_UI32_Size);
    free(l_pData);
}

//Copy the shared memory with ReadProcessMemory
void ProcessCopySharedMemory(UINT32 a_UI32_Size)
{
    bip::windows_shared_memory m_shm(bip::open_only, "Global\\testSharedMemory", bip::read_only);
    bip::mapped_region l_region(m_shm, bip::read_only);
    void* l_pData = malloc(a_UI32_Size);
    HANDLE hProcess = OpenProcess( PROCESS_ALL_ACCESS, FALSE,(DWORD) GetCurrentProcessId());
    size_t l_szt_CurRemote_Readsize;
    ReadProcessMemory(hProcess,
                      (LPCVOID)((void*)l_region.get_address()),
                      l_pData,
                      a_UI32_Size,
                      (SIZE_T*)&l_szt_CurRemote_Readsize);
    free(l_pData);
}

// do 2 memcpy on the same shared memory
void CopySharedMemory2(UINT32 a_UI32_Size)
{
    bip::windows_shared_memory m_shm(bip::open_only, "Global\\testSharedMemory", bip::read_only);
    bip::mapped_region l_region(m_shm, bip::read_only);
    clock_t begin = clock();
    void* l_pData = malloc(a_UI32_Size);
    memcpy(l_pData, l_region.get_address(), a_UI32_Size);
    clock_t end = clock();
    std::cout << "FirstCopy: " << (end - begin) * 1000 / CLOCKS_PER_SEC << " ms" << std::endl; 
    free(l_pData);

    begin = clock();
    l_pData = malloc(a_UI32_Size);
    memcpy(l_pData, l_region.get_address(), a_UI32_Size);
    end = clock();
    std::cout << "SecondCopy: " << (end - begin) * 1000 / CLOCKS_PER_SEC << " ms" << std::endl; 
    free(l_pData);
}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    UINT32 l_UI32_Size = 1048576000;
    bip::windows_shared_memory* l_pShm = AllocateSharedMemory(l_UI32_Size);
    clock_t begin = clock();
    for (int i=0; i<10 ; i++)
        CopySharedMemory(l_UI32_Size);
    clock_t end = clock();
    std::cout << "MemCopy: " << (end - begin) * 1000 / CLOCKS_PER_SEC << " ms" << std::endl; 
    begin = clock();
    for (int i=0; i<10 ; i++)
        ProcessCopySharedMemory(l_UI32_Size);
    end = clock();
    std::cout << "ReadProcessMemory: " << (end - begin) * 1000 / CLOCKS_PER_SEC << " ms" << std::endl; 

    for (int i=0; i<10 ; i++)
        CopySharedMemory2(l_UI32_Size);

    delete l_pShm;
    return 0;
}

And here is the output :

MemCopy: 8891 ms
ReadProcessMemory: 6068 ms

FirstCopy: 796 ms
SecondCopy: 327 ms
FirstCopy: 795 ms
SecondCopy: 328 ms
FirstCopy: 780 ms
SecondCopy: 344 ms
FirstCopy: 780 ms
SecondCopy: 343 ms
FirstCopy: 780 ms
SecondCopy: 327 ms
FirstCopy: 795 ms
SecondCopy: 343 ms
FirstCopy: 780 ms
SecondCopy: 344 ms
FirstCopy: 796 ms
SecondCopy: 343 ms
FirstCopy: 796 ms
SecondCopy: 327 ms
FirstCopy: 780 ms
SecondCopy: 328 ms

If anybody has an idea on why the memcpy is so slow and if there is a solution to this problem, I'm all ears.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
How do you compile your code? With which version of the compiler? With recent versions of GCC i.e. GCC 4.7 (hence with Cygwin, Mingw, ....), when optimizing with -O2 or -O3, the calls to memcpy are magically very well optimized. Other compilers might be less clever. –  Basile Starynkevitch Nov 23 '12 at 8:40
1  
Also, the fact that your data has been processed once before make it probably near the L2 processor cache.... So you might want to compare two different executions, and run them several times. –  Basile Starynkevitch Nov 23 '12 at 8:43
1  
If you execute first the ReadProcessMemory and then memcpy, the results are the same? Maybe it is something related to the processor having the portion to copy in the cache during the second attempt. –  Paolo Brandoli Nov 23 '12 at 8:43
    
I'm using visual studio 2010 with the default option. I'm updating the output cause I was in debug when I copied them (silly me). –  darkpotpot Nov 23 '12 at 8:44
4  
Might be related to how OS handles memory. Using 'memcpy' would need the OS to sift through its process/memory tables for each new page copied. Using ReadProcessMemory tells the OS directly which pages from which process to which other process. Try benchmarking with less than one page. –  ActiveTrayPrntrTagDataStrDrvr Nov 23 '12 at 8:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

My comment as answer for reference.

Using 'memcpy' across a big chunk of memory would need the OS to sift through its process/memory tables for each new page copied. Using 'ReadProcessMemory', in turn, tells the OS directly which pages from which process to which other process should be copied.

This difference went away as you benchmarked with a single page, confirming some of this.

I could guess that the reason why 'memcpy' is faster in the 'small' scenario might be that 'ReadProcessMemory' has an extra switch from user to kernel mode to do. Memcpy, on the other hand, sort of offloads the task to the underlying memory management system, which always runs in parallel with your process and is supported natively by the hardware to some extent.

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