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How can I pass values to struct variable I'm trying to get the employee information from the user then write them in a file, but I got a segmentation fault after entering employee name. This is my code.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

struct record_em{
    int id;
    char name[20];
    int salary;
    int age;
};

int main( void )
{
    struct record_em employee;
    FILE *fp;
    int id, salary, age;
    char name[20];
    int n=1;

    fp = fopen("empRecord.dat","a");
    while(n==1){
        printf("\nEnter Employee ID\n");
        scanf("%d",&id);
        employee.id=id;
        printf("\nEnter Employee Name\n");
        scanf("%s",name);
        employee.name=name;
        printf("\nEnter Employee Salary\n");
        scanf("%d",&salary);
        employee.salary=salary;
        printf("\nEnter Employee Age\n");
        scanf("%d",&age);
        employee.age=age;
        fwrite(&employee,sizeof(employee),1,fp);
        printf("Enter 1 to add new record \n");
        scanf("%d",&n);
    }

    fclose(fp);

    return 0;
    }

Output (taken from comment):

Fatmahs-MacBook-Air:~ fatmah$ gcc -o em em.c
Fatmahs-MacBook-Air:~ fatmah$ ./em
Enter Employee ID
88
Enter Employee Name
uu
Segmentation fault: 11 
share|improve this question
2  
I don't understand how a segmentation fault can occur as this should not complile: employee.name=name;. Is this the exact code? –  hmjd Nov 23 '12 at 10:17
    
yes, Fatmahs-MacBook-Air:~ fatmah$ gcc -o em em.c Fatmahs-MacBook-Air:~ fatmah$ ./em Enter Employee ID 88 Enter Employee Name uu Segmentation fault: 11 –  fatimah Nov 23 '12 at 10:21
    
See ideone.com/3JvSwG for error: incompatible types in assignment compiler failure message. –  hmjd Nov 23 '12 at 10:24
    
Take a little look [Comparing and checking columns in two files][1]: [1]: stackoverflow.com/questions/13438941/… –  Alberto Bonsanto Nov 23 '12 at 10:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Change

scanf("%s",name);
employee.name=name;

to

scanf("%s",name);
strcpy(employee.name, name);

Of, better still, as suggested by Dukeling & hmjd

scanf("%19s", employee.name);
share|improve this answer
2  
How about just scanf("%s", employee.name)? Careful of buffer overflow. –  Dukeling Nov 23 '12 at 10:12
    
@Dukeling Good point, that'd be better –  simonc Nov 23 '12 at 10:13
1  
Better again: scanf("%19s", employee.name); to avoid buffer overrun. –  hmjd Nov 23 '12 at 10:15
    
:) thanks it works but it write rubbish to the file ! –  fatimah Nov 23 '12 at 10:20
    
What gets written to file? Are you reading the file using a text or hex editor? Remember that the ints you write will be written as 4 bytes and won't be rendered as a number in a text editor. And that the name will have some text, then a nul (char code 0) character, then some uninitialised data. –  simonc Nov 23 '12 at 10:27

Here is one major problem:

scanf("%s",name);
employee.name=name;

The member name is an array, you can't assign to it. Instead use strcpy to copy to it.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks it works but it write a rubbish to the file ! –  fatimah Nov 23 '12 at 10:16
  1. Create a typedef struct record_tto make the things shorter and easier to understand.

    typedef struct {
        int id;
        char name[20];
        int salary;
        int age;
    } record_t;
    
  2. Create the file and format it first.

    void file2Creator( FILE *fp )
    {
        int i; // Counter to create the file.
        record_t data = { 0, "", 0, 0 }; // A blank example to format the file.
    
        /* You will create 100 consecutive records*/
        for( i = 1; i <= 100; i++ ){
            fwrite( &data, sizeof( record_t ), 1, fp );
        }
    
        fclose( fp ); // You can close the file here or later however you need.  
    }
    
  3. Write the function to fill the file.

    void fillFile( FILE *fp )
    {
        int position;
        record_t data = { 0, "", 0, 0 };
    
    
        printf( "Enter the position to fill (1-100) 0 to finish:\n?" );
        scanf( "%d", &position );
    
        while( position != 0 ){
            printf( "Enter the id, name, and the two other values (integers):\n?" );
            fscanf( stdin, "%d%s%d%d", &data.id, data.name, data.salary, data.age );
    
            /* You have to seek the pointer. */
            fseek( fp, ( position - 1 ) * sizeof( record_t ), SEEK_SET );
            fwrite( &data, sizeof( record_t ), 1, fp );
            printf( "Enter a new position (1-100) 0 to finish:\n?" );
            scanf( "%d", &position );
        }
    
        fclose( fPtr ); //You can close the file or not, depends in what you need.
    }
    

You can use this as reference Comparing and checking columns in two files

share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot, but it does not write the ints as they are ! –  fatimah Nov 23 '12 at 11:21

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