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I am trying to establish a communication pipe between a C executable and python script. Below is the Python script, and the weird thing about this is the following. If I run the python script as below, then the C executable NEVER sees any data on the socket.

However, if I uncomment the Reader class (ie., only writting to the socket is enabled) then the C executeable ALWAYS receives the data on the socket. Has anyone an explanation why this is not working when the Reader and Writer thread are running simultaneously?

class Reader(Thread):
    def __init__(self):
        Thread.__init__(self)
        self.daemon = True
    def run(self):
        while True:
            s = socket.socket(socket.AF_UNIX, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
            s.connect("/tmp/demo_socket")               
            nonce = s.recv(4)
            s.close

            if len(nonce) == 4:
                print("Result received \n")

class Writer(Thread):
    def __init__(self):
        Thread.__init__(self)
    def run(self):
        while True:
            payload = "Hello World"
            s = socket.socket(socket.AF_UNIX, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
            s.connect("/tmp/demo_socket")           
            s.send(payload)
            s.close()

reader = Reader()
writer = Writer()

reader.start()
writer.start()


try:
    while True:
        sleep(10000)
except KeyboardInterrupt:
    print("Terminated")

EDIT:

As suggested I am trying to open the connection globally as below but that gives me two additional problems:

1) After sending data, only 4 bytes should be received on the Python end but it seems I am receiving an endless stream of data...

2) Where can I close this globally opened stream?

s = socket.socket(socket.AF_UNIX, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
s.connect("/tmp/demo_socket")  

class Reader(Thread):
    def __init__(self):
        Thread.__init__(self)
        self.daemon = True
    def run(self):
        while True:        
            nonce = s.recv(4)

            if len(nonce) == 4:
                print("Result received \n")

class Writer(Thread):
    def __init__(self):
        Thread.__init__(self)
    def run(self):
        while True:
            payload = "Hello World"         
            s.send(payload)

reader = Reader()
writer = Writer()

reader.start()
writer.start()


try:
    while True:
        sleep(10000)
except KeyboardInterrupt:
    print("Terminated")
share|improve this question
    
Can the C program handle multiple connections? Which leads to the questions, why open two different connections? And why connect over and over and over again in a loop instead of opening the connection once outside the loop, or keep one global connection for both threads to use? –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 23 '12 at 10:42
    
No need for multiple connections, the python script reads data, sends it over the socket to the C exe, this does some work and sends then the result back to the Python script. Maybe I should not open and close the socket in each thread? Can I open this socket "globally" once? –  Patrick Nov 23 '12 at 10:45
    
Yes you do, you connect in both threads, each thread creates a separate connection, so the "server" needs to be able to handle multiple connections. And yes, opening this once in a global connection is what I recommend (and what the questions in my first comment is about). –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 23 '12 at 10:46
    
Are you sure the C program acts correctly? –  glglgl Nov 23 '12 at 11:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

1) After sending data, only 4 bytes should be received on the Python end but it seems I am receiving an endless stream of data...

Your sender keeps on sending, and if the data you receive are replies to that, the server keeps on answering.

2) Where can I close this globally opened stream?

After you don't need it any longer... Do you have a stop condition or something like that?

share|improve this answer

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