Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
    class Program
    {
       public delegate void MyDelatage();

       public event MyDelatage MyEvent;

       public Program()
       {
           MyEvent += Fun;
       }
       public void Fun()
       {
          Console.WriteLine("Base class");
       }
       public void RaiseMyEvent()
       {
          if(MyEvent != null)
                MyEvent();
           }
       }

    class Child : Program
    {
        public void Start()
        {
           //base.MyEvent();//not allowed
           RaiseMyEvent();
         }
     }

Why can't I access MyEvent in child class ?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Because event is sort of syntactic sugar that involves generating private fields which are not visible in derived classes.

share|improve this answer

"...When you create a class that can be used as a base class for other classes, you must account for the fact that events are a special type of delegate that can only be invoked from within the class that declared them. Derived classes cannot directly invoke events that are declared within the base class. Although sometimes you may want an event that can only be raised by the base class, in most cases you should enable the derived class to invoke base class events. ..." (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hy3sefw3(v=vs.80).aspx)

You should write something like this in your base class:

public event EventHandler<EventArgs> OnButtonClick;
...
protected virtual void OnReady(object sender, EventArgs e) {
    if(OnButtonClick != null) {
        OnButtonClick(sender, e);
    }
}

And in your child class call this method, i.e:

base.OnReady(sender, e);
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.