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I would like to use multiple times Eq, so that the second element of the first tuplet is from another type than the rest

Wrong, but, it is the idea what I want

eg. [(a, a)] -> [(a, a)] -> Bool ----> [(a, b)] -> [(a, a)] -> Bool

the code

canColor ::  Eq a => [(a, a)] -> [(a, a)] -> Bool
canColor _ [] = True
canColor xs ((x,y):rest) =
    if findNeighbour xs x == findNeighbour xs y
    then False
    else canColor xs rest

findNeighbour :: Eq a => [(a, a)] -> a -> Maybe a
findNeighbour [] _ = Nothing
findNeighbour ((x,y):rest) z =
    if x == z
    then Just y
    else findNeighbour rest z

The inputdata and expectation value

Main> canColor [('a',"purple"),('b',"green"),('c',"blue")] [('a','b'),('b','c'),('c','a')]
True

Main> canColor [('a',"purple"),('b',"green"),('c',"purple")] [('a','b'),('b','c'),('c','a')]
False

Main> canColor [('1',"purple"),('2',"green"),('3',"blue")] [('1','2'),('2','3'),('3','1')]
True

**Main> canColor [('a', 4),('b',5),('c', 6 )] [('a','b'),('b','c'),('c','a')]
True

Main> colors [('a', 4),('b', 4 ),('c', 5 )] [('a','b'),('b','c'),('c','a')]
False**
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findNeighbour seems to be lookup with its arguments swaped. Note that lookup allows for (a,b) instead of (a,a). Does that help? –  Joachim Breitner Nov 23 '12 at 11:47
2  
Haskell's type inference means many of these questions can be answered by just removing the type signatures and examining the function with :t in GHCi. (I.e. without the explicit type signature GHC will infer canColor :: (Eq a, Eq b) => [(a,b)] -> [(a,a)] -> Bool.) –  dbaupp Nov 23 '12 at 14:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Simply give them different type variables and require Eq for both. I think you are looking for this code:

canColor ::  (Eq a, Eq b) => [(a, b)] -> [(a, a)] -> Bool
canColor _ [] = True
canColor xs ((x,y):rest) =
    if findNeighbour xs x == findNeighbour xs y
    then False
    else canColor xs rest

findNeighbour :: Eq a => [(a, b)] -> a -> Maybe b
findNeighbour [] _ = Nothing
findNeighbour ((x,y):rest) z =
    if x == z
    then Just y
    else findNeighbour rest z

or this more succinct and idiomatic code:

canColor ::  (Eq a, Eq b) => [(a, b)] -> [(a, a)] -> Bool
canColor xs = all (\(x,y) -> lookup x xs /= lookup y xs)
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