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I am trying to split a comma-separated string and then perform some action on each token, but ignoring duplicates, so sth. along the following lines:

int main(int, char**)
{
   string text = "token, test   string";

  char_separator<char> sep(", ");
  tokenizer< char_separator<char> > tokens(text, sep);
  // remove duplicates from tokens?
  BOOST_FOREACH (const string& t, tokens) {
    cout << t << "." << endl;
  }
}

Is there a way to do this on the boost::tokenizer?

I know that I can solve this problem using boost::split and std::unique, but was wondering whether there is a way to achieve this with the tokenizer as well.

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std::unique only works on sorted ranges, is your input always sorted? (If not, are you interested in filtering all duplicates, or just adjacent elements that are identical to each other) –  Mankarse Nov 23 '12 at 12:19
    
I'm pretty sure the answer is no -- tokenizer doesn't keep track of previous tokens, so it has no way to know whether the current token is new or duplicates a previous one. –  Jerry Coffin Nov 23 '12 at 12:47
    
@Mankarse: you are right, there is an additional call to std::sort that I make in the boost::split case. –  tt293 Nov 23 '12 at 15:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

boost.tokenizer can do many cool things, but it cannot do this, the answer is indeed "no".

If you're only looking to drop adjacent duplicates, boost.range can help make it seemless:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <boost/range/adaptor/uniqued.hpp>
#include <boost/foreach.hpp>
#include <boost/tokenizer.hpp>

using namespace boost;
using namespace boost::adaptors;
int main()
{
    std::string text = "token, test   string test, test   test";

    char_separator<char> sep(", ");
    tokenizer< char_separator<char> > tokens(text, sep);
    BOOST_FOREACH (const std::string& t, tokens | uniqued ) {
        std::cout << t << "." << '\n';
    }
}

This prints:

token.
test.
string.
test.

In order to do some action only on globally unique tokens, you will need to store state, one way or another. The simplest solution is probably an intermediate set:

char_separator<char> sep(", ");
tokenizer< char_separator<char> > tokens(text, sep);
std::set<std::string> unique_tokens(tokens.begin(), tokens.end());
BOOST_FOREACH (const std::string& t, unique_tokens) {
        std::cout << t << "." << '\n';
}
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