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I have a big memory leak and I need some help in finding out where it comes from. First, some theory about the code:

It is a Kinect project. It is a MFC project build in MS Visual Studio 2012 and it uses Direct2D to put images on the screen. This problem occurs when I switch from Kinect 1 to Kinect 2. Every object except for the "main" object is then rebuilt (deconstructed/released and put to NULL (if pointer)). This includes:

  • All Direct2D objects (Factory, Rendertargets, bitmaps, brushes, everything)
  • A Kinect facetracker with a thread
  • A kinect object with a thread.

For every new keyword I used the delete keyword in the destructor (so I did nothing to destruct the pointers which had not been initialized with new). I closed all thread handlers and put them to NULL.

And now I have a memory leak and I need some help finding it. I started by using the MS MFC tools

I have some output right after the initialization:

Dumping objects ->
{402} normal block at 0x1531E8F0, 28 bytes long.
 Data: <<       @       > 3C 07 06 00 F0 00 00 00 40 01 00 00 00 05 00 00 
{401} normal block at 0x152F6CD8, 96 bytes long.
 Data: <    >           > 00 CD CD CD 3E 07 06 00 D0 04 00 00 D8 17 00 00 
{400} normal block at 0x03EA0040, 1229064 bytes long.
 Data: <R            E, > 52 07 06 00 B8 A9 13 00 D0 87 D0 00 18 45 2C 15 
{396} normal block at 0x152C9EA0, 20 bytes long.
 Data: <                > 80 F9 89 00 01 00 00 00 01 00 00 00 01 00 00 00 
c:\users\work\documents\github\kinectmain\testmfc\main.cpp(148) : {305} client block at 0x152CF618, subtype c0, 8 bytes long.
a CFont object at $152CF618, 8 bytes long
{295} normal block at 0x152CFC20, 24 bytes long.
 Data: <X   ( , X       > 58 07 CC 00 28 F8 2C 15 58 07 CC 00 00 00 CD CD 
{284} normal block at 0x152CF828, 24 bytes long.
 Data: <X   X     ,     > 58 07 CC 00 58 07 CC 00 20 FC 2C 15 01 00 CD CD 
{206} normal block at 0x00CD0588, 12 bytes long.
 Data: <    @       > B0 04 CD 00 40 05 CD 00 B8 A9 13 00 
{205} normal block at 0x00CD0540, 12 bytes long.
 Data: <            > 88 05 CD 00 B0 04 CD 00 18 BE 13 00 
{204} normal block at 0x00CD04F8, 8 bytes long.
 Data: <        > EC F3 89 00 00 00 00 00 
{203} normal block at 0x00CD04B0, 12 bytes long.
 Data: <@           > 40 05 CD 00 88 05 CD 00 CD CD CD CD 
{202} normal block at 0x00CD0468, 12 bytes long.
 Data: <    H       > 08 FE CC 00 48 A5 CC 00 18 BE 13 00 
{201} normal block at 0x00CCFE08, 12 bytes long.
 Data: <H   h       > 48 A5 CC 00 68 04 CD 00 B8 A9 13 00 
{200} normal block at 0x00CCA590, 8 bytes long.
 Data: <        > FC A4 CC 00 00 00 00 00 
{199} normal block at 0x00CCA548, 12 bytes long.
 Data: <h           > 68 04 CD 00 08 FE CC 00 CD CD CD CD 
c:\users\work\documents\github\kinectmain\testmfc\main.cpp(163) : {198} normal block at 0x00CCA4F8, 16 bytes long.
 Data: <R       H       > 52 07 06 00 90 A5 CC 00 48 A5 CC 00 02 00 00 00 
{188} normal block at 0x00CC07B0, 8 bytes long.
 Data: <        > 9C FB A1 00 00 00 00 00 
{187} normal block at 0x00CC0758, 24 bytes long.
 Data: <( , ( ,   ,     > 28 F8 2C 15 28 F8 2C 15 20 FC 2C 15 01 01 CD CD 
Object dump complete.
0 bytes in 0 Free Blocks.
1229392 bytes in 17 Normal Blocks.
13498 bytes in 73 CRT Blocks.
0 bytes in 0 Ignore Blocks.
8 bytes in 1 Client Blocks.
Largest number used: 1245916 bytes.
Total allocations: 2504946 bytes.

And after a kinect switch:

Dumping objects ->
{961} normal block at 0x1531E8F0, 28 bytes long.
 Data: <<       @       > 3C 07 06 00 F0 00 00 00 40 01 00 00 00 05 00 00 
{960} normal block at 0x1534A658, 96 bytes long.
 Data: <    >   p       > 00 CD CD CD 3E 07 06 00 70 05 00 00 A8 15 00 00 
{959} normal block at 0x03EA0040, 1229064 bytes long.
 Data: <R         ,   4 > 52 07 06 00 18 BE 13 00 90 F1 2C 15 98 9B 34 15 
{956} normal block at 0x152CBFD0, 20 bytes long.
 Data: <                > 80 F9 89 00 01 00 00 00 01 00 00 00 01 00 00 00 
c:\users\work\documents\github\kinectmain\testmfc\main.cpp(148) : {305} client block at 0x152CF618, subtype c0, 8 bytes long.
a CFont object at $152CF618, 8 bytes long
{295} normal block at 0x152CFC20, 24 bytes long.
 Data: <X   ( , X       > 58 07 CC 00 28 F8 2C 15 58 07 CC 00 00 00 CD CD 
{284} normal block at 0x152CF828, 24 bytes long.
 Data: <X   X     ,     > 58 07 CC 00 58 07 CC 00 20 FC 2C 15 01 00 CD CD 
{206} normal block at 0x00CD0588, 12 bytes long.
 Data: <    @       > B0 04 CD 00 40 05 CD 00 B8 A9 13 00 
{205} normal block at 0x00CD0540, 12 bytes long.
 Data: <            > 88 05 CD 00 B0 04 CD 00 18 BE 13 00 
{204} normal block at 0x00CD04F8, 8 bytes long.
 Data: <        > EC F3 89 00 00 00 00 00 
{203} normal block at 0x00CD04B0, 12 bytes long.
 Data: <@           > 40 05 CD 00 88 05 CD 00 CD CD CD CD 
{202} normal block at 0x00CD0468, 12 bytes long.
 Data: <    H       > 08 FE CC 00 48 A5 CC 00 18 BE 13 00 
{201} normal block at 0x00CCFE08, 12 bytes long.
 Data: <H   h       > 48 A5 CC 00 68 04 CD 00 B8 A9 13 00 
{200} normal block at 0x00CCA590, 8 bytes long.
 Data: <        > FC A4 CC 00 00 00 00 00 
{199} normal block at 0x00CCA548, 12 bytes long.
 Data: <h           > 68 04 CD 00 08 FE CC 00 CD CD CD CD 
c:\users\work\documents\github\kinectmain\testmfc\main.cpp(163) : {198} normal block at 0x00CCA4F8, 16 bytes long.
 Data: <R       H       > 52 07 06 00 90 A5 CC 00 48 A5 CC 00 02 00 00 00 
{188} normal block at 0x00CC07B0, 8 bytes long.
 Data: <        > 9C FB A1 00 00 00 00 00 
{187} normal block at 0x00CC0758, 24 bytes long.
 Data: <( , ( ,   ,     > 28 F8 2C 15 28 F8 2C 15 20 FC 2C 15 01 01 CD CD 
Object dump complete.
0 bytes in 0 Free Blocks.
1229392 bytes in 17 Normal Blocks.
13498 bytes in 73 CRT Blocks.
0 bytes in 0 Ignore Blocks.
8 bytes in 1 Client Blocks.
Largest number used: 1245916 bytes.
Total allocations: 3742634 bytes.

So the total allocation rises from 2504946 bytes to 3742634 bytes, but nothing else changes.

Also with every switch I get the following error:

calling DestroyWindow in CWnd::~CWnd; OnDestroy or PostNcDestroy in derived class will not be called.

Even though I am not calling destroyWindow until the program is closed.

The complete source code can be found over here: https://github.com/ProjectPrague/KinectMain/tree/Bugfixing-Branch

Any tips, suggestions or hints about what could be the cause or what tool I can use to find the cause would be awesome.

share|improve this question
    
Notice that some of the output show a file name and line number, and sometimes a class name? Start looking there. – Joachim Pileborg Nov 23 '12 at 12:31

Those numbers in the { } brackets are allocation order numbers. if your program is completely deterministic and does exactly the same thing every time then those numbers should stay the same from one run to the next.

In which case you can use this trick. Add the following code to the top of your main function:

long lBreakAlloc = 0;
if ( lBreakAlloc > 0 )
{
    _CrtSetBreakAlloc( lBreakAlloc );
}

Then set a breakpoint on that if statement and start your program. When it stops at the if, change the value of lBreakAlloc to match the allocation order number of your first block of leaked memory and then let the program continue.

When it reaches the point at which it's allocating that block of memory, hey presto! It will stop in the debugger and you can see exactly which allocation is not being freed.

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't this only work for MFC objects? – Cheiron Nov 26 '12 at 8:37
    
The OP is using MFC. – Paul Mitchell Nov 26 '12 at 8:58
    
I AM OP. My question is: " Does this work with non-MFC objects? " Because I am not only working with MFC, for example I am also working with Direct2D and Kinect. – Cheiron Nov 26 '12 at 9:57
    
Sorry, i didn't notice you were the OP. Yes it works with non-MFC objects as well. As long as you're linking with the debug CRT you can use this method for any allocations. – Paul Mitchell Nov 26 '12 at 12:12
    
I have now the following: - A 45 MB memory leak when I change from kinect A to Kinect B - A dump that runs everytime the kinect destructor runs. This memoryState does a checkpoint at the very start of the destructor and does a dump at the end. So it will print every object that has not been properly destructed. There are around 10 objects that are never destructed within that run and this is correct: those objects should not be destructed until the end of the program (always the same code, checked them all out). So I have a 45 MB Leak and no clue where it comes from. Any ideas? – Cheiron Nov 28 '12 at 11:41

Your unInit method in the Kinect class is definitely a source of memory leaks. Every field is set to null without first deleting the object pointed at (if any). I also spotted at least one method that returns a pointer to a new object (selectKinect). Unless you carefully manage these objects then they will also be a source of memory leaks.

You may wish to consider using a library to help you with your memory management. Boost's shared pointers are quite useful.

#include <boost/shared_ptr.hpp>

using boost::shared_ptr;

shared_ptr<Kinect> kinect(new Kinnect);

kinect->SomeMethodOnKinnect();

Boost's shared pointers use reference counting to know when to delete an object and automatically update an object's reference count when shared_ptr constructor and destructor are called.

You really need to go over your code with a fine-toothed comb as your code seems riddled with memory leaks. The following code says it should be deleting pointers, but is just setting them to NULL.

//Should delete a pointer and set it to NULL
void FaceTracking::Release()
{
    faceTrackingResult = NULL;
    nuiPresent = NULL;
    ColorBuffer = NULL;
    DepthBuffer = NULL;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I gave the wrong link (fixed now), most of the unInit method is now part of the destructor and has a delete function before being set to NULL. But I am still wondering, what is the right thing to do? Most of those pointers were not initialized with the new keyword, do I still need to use delete before setting them to NULL? – Cheiron Nov 23 '12 at 13:03
    
You must always delete a pointer if it is not null and the last pointer to the object. Sometimes library methods create new objects and leave how and when to dispose of the object up to you. This is what fopen in C does (though fclose should be used to release the memory). – Dunes Nov 23 '12 at 16:11
    
Allright! Based on your tips I fixed a lot of leaking already, but there is still a bit (If you want to think with me: source over here: github.com/ProjectPrague/KinectMain). I have now correctly destructed every pointer (I think) and now I am looking at the objects (non-pointers). Do I need to destruct them too? Or will they be cleaned up when they go out of scope? – Cheiron Nov 24 '12 at 22:00

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