Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I'm just a beginner for C programming. Can I ask a simple question ? What's the difference between (int) sizeof(void *) and int ?

ex)

#define ptrint          int
#define PTRINT          ((int) sizeof(void *))
share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

The first case acts as an alias for int so you can use ptrint instead of int.

The second case is the size of a pointer in bytes. So for instance on a 32 bit system it will return 4.

ptrint a = 8;
ptrint b = a;

int sizeofptr = PTRINT;
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer. : ) – user573566 Nov 23 '12 at 13:06

One is a type, the other an expression returning the size of a type.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. Can I ask one more question ? What is the size of (void *) ? – user573566 Nov 23 '12 at 13:03
    
@user573566 The size of a pointer can differ depending on platform. On 32-bit platforms it's typically four bytes (32 bits), and on 64-bit platforms it's typically eight bytes (64 bits). – Joachim Pileborg Nov 23 '12 at 13:06

With ptrint, you just define a new type that is just an alias for int, example:

ptrint a;
a = 5;
printf("%d",(int) a); // all this is ok.

with PTRINT, you define a integer constant that will contain the size of a void* pointer on your system. Example:

printf("Size of a void* pointer is %d\n",PTRINT); // will work. 
PTRINT a;  // will fail
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer. : ) – user573566 Nov 23 '12 at 13:07

((int) sizeof(void *)) is a value (that depends of your system and compiler implementations), int is a type.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer. : ) – user573566 Nov 23 '12 at 13:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.