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Can somebody help me explaining the following code:

Why the char *s doesn't receive the point location of memory allocated at foo()?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

char *foo()
{
    char *s = (char *)malloc(20);
    s = "Hello Heap.";
    return s;
}

void bar(char *s)
{
    s = foo();
    printf("bar: %s\n", s); // Works fine just as expected.
}

int main()
{
    char *s;
    bar(s);
    printf("%s\n", s); // Output some undefined content like `H?}?H??`, other than `Hello Heap.`
}
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The code fixed

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

char *foo()
{
    char *s = (char *)malloc(20);
    strcpy(s,"Hello Heap.");
    return s;
}

void bar(char **s)
{
    *s = foo();
    printf("bar: %s\n", *s); // Works fine just as expected.
}

int main()
{
    char *s;
    bar(&s);
    printf("%s\n", s); // Output some undefined content like `H?}?H??`, other than `Hello Heap.`
}

Explanation:

1) Your code contains:

char *s = (char *)malloc(20);
 s = "Hello Heap.";

This not good. In this way you are not copying the "Hello Heap." message into the allocated memory. In fact you have pointed the s pointer to allocated memory and then you have pointed your pointer to a constant string address

2) Your code contains

void bar(char *s)
{
    s = foo();
    printf("bar: %s\n", s); // Works fine just as expected.
}

in this function s is getting the pointer (pointer to allocated memory) from the foo() function. but you are not communicating the s pointer address to the function higher leve (main). to do you have to return the address of s at the end of the function or you can pass via address of address of pointer by using input parameter cha ** s

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Cool. Thank you! I'm learning C again ;) –  mitnk Nov 23 '12 at 13:37
    
you are welcome –  MOHAMED Nov 23 '12 at 13:38
1  
I didn't downvote, but it's probably because you posted a code only answer. Please explain why the pointer to the char pointer is necessary –  stefan Nov 23 '12 at 13:38
    
Thanks again for your keyword communicating. –  mitnk Nov 23 '12 at 14:25
    
u are welcome again –  MOHAMED Nov 23 '12 at 15:44
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char *foo()
{
    char *s = (char *)malloc(20);
    s = "Hello Heap.";
    return s;
}

Here s in foo is local to foo and after allocation you are actually assigning the "Hello heap " which is string literal and not on the heap (mind it). but anyway s="Hello heap " is correct and returning s is captured in bar and that s you are printing.

Now think about main,

bar(s) is fine but in the printf the s you are using is the local to main so printing other stuff,It's not that s which you are accessing in the bar

You should try this instead:

call in the main like this , bar(&s)

and change the signature of as bar(char **s)

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You must use StrCpy or strncpy just after the memory allocation.

You are not allowed to say that 's' is equal to ""

this is not tru in C. This is a dirty example but try to do:

    s[0] = 'h';
s[1] = 'e';
s[2] = 'l';
s[3] = '\0';

You are missing something into the allocation process ;)

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