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I am trying to get the results of the query below:

select distinct
       REQ_ID
     , ID
     , MAX(STEP) as step
     , SUBSTRING(p1.NAME,9, len(p1.NAME)) as _index_
     , p2.value as location

from HISTORY h

LEFT JOIN Parameter p1 
on     p1.WP_ID=h.ID
   AND (   (    p1.NAME like 'name_' 
            AND p1.VALUE like h.ID COLLATE DATABASE_DEFAULT ) 
        OR (    p1.NAME like 'name__' 
            AND p1.VALUE like h.ID COLLATE DATABASE_DEFAULT) )

LEFT JOIN Parameter p2 
on     p2.WP_ID=h.ID 
   AND p2.PA_NAME = 'Location' + (SUBSTRING(p1.NAME,9, len(p1.NAME)) ) 

WHERE h.ROLE = 'rock'

GROUP BY REQ_ID, ID, step, p1.name, p2.value

The problem is that the query is returning more than 1 results (in my case there are 6) and the MAX(STEP) value is not returning the max, I can see values like 0,1,3,0,1,2 Is there a way to get only the result with the max(step)? the step field is varchar(1)

share|improve this question
    
Just a side note. Using max(step) doesn't work if you group by step. Since each distinct step is a new group, there is only one distinct value for step in that group, so max(step) is always that one step. Maybe SQL Server handles the aliasing differently (since you also use step as an alias for max(step), but I think this might be where you go wrong. To prevent confusion, I would choose a different alias, like max_step. – GolezTrol Nov 23 '12 at 14:26
1  
Common and good advice: Show us some example input data and the results you would want from that input data. – MatBailie Nov 23 '12 at 15:31
up vote 0 down vote accepted

When dealing with first record in a group, the often simplest approach is to use ROW_NUMBER(). Without knowing more about your schema and data, I can say that the following query will work, but it may be possible to simplifiy it further...

WITH
  sequenced_data AS
(
  SELECT
    REQ_ID,
    ID,
    ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY req_id, id ORDER BY step DESC) AS sequence_id,
    STEP,
    SUBSTRING(p1.NAME,9, len(p1.NAME)) as _index_,
    p2.value as location
  FROM
    HISTORY    h
  LEFT JOIN
    Parameter  p1
      ON  p1.WP_ID = h.ID
      AND (   (p1.NAME like 'name_' AND p1.VALUE  like h.ID COLLATE DATABASE_DEFAULT ) 
           OR (p1.NAME like 'name__' AND p1.VALUE  like h.ID COLLATE DATABASE_DEFAULT)
          )
  LEFT JOIN
    Parameter  p2
      ON  p2.WP_ID = h.ID
      AND p2.PA_NAME = 'Location' + (SUBSTRING(p1.NAME,9, len(p1.NAME)) ) 
  WHERE
    h.ROLE = 'rock'
  GROUP BY
    REQ_ID,
    ID,
    STEP,
    SUBSTRING(p1.NAME,9, len(p1.NAME)),
    p2.value
)
SELECT
  *
FROM
  sequenced_data
WHERE
  sequence_id = 1

This will give only one row per req_id, id combination, and will always pick the row with the highest step value.

NOTE: I don't know if the GROUP BY is still needed. I left it in simply because you had it.

share|improve this answer

Try this way (remove step from group by):

select REQ_ID,ID,MAX(STEP) as step,SUBSTRING(p1.NAME,9, len(p1.NAME)) as _index_,
p2.value as location
from HISTORY h
LEFT JOIN Parameter p1 on p1.WP_ID  =h.ID  AND 
( (p1.NAME like 'name_' AND p1.VALUE  like h.ID COLLATE DATABASE_DEFAULT ) 
OR (p1.NAME like 'name__' AND p1.VALUE  like h.ID COLLATE DATABASE_DEFAULT) )
LEFT JOIN Parameter p2 on p2.WP_ID=h.ID AND p2.PA_NAME = 'Location' + (SUBSTRING(p1.NAME,9, len(p1.NAME)) ) 
WHERE h.ROLE = 'rock'
GROUP BY REQ_ID,ID, p1.name, p2.value

or

remove step and add SUBSTRING(p1.NAME,9, len(p1.NAME)) to group by:

select REQ_ID,ID,MAX(STEP) as step,SUBSTRING(p1.NAME,9, len(p1.NAME)) as _index_,
p2.value as location
from HISTORY h
LEFT JOIN Parameter p1 on p1.WP_ID  =h.ID  AND 
( (p1.NAME like 'name_' AND p1.VALUE  like h.ID COLLATE DATABASE_DEFAULT ) 
OR (p1.NAME like 'name__' AND p1.VALUE  like h.ID COLLATE DATABASE_DEFAULT) )
LEFT JOIN Parameter p2 on p2.WP_ID=h.ID AND p2.PA_NAME = 'Location' + (SUBSTRING(p1.NAME,9, len(p1.NAME)) ) 
WHERE h.ROLE = 'rock'
GROUP BY REQ_ID,ID, SUBSTRING(p1.NAME,9, len(p1.NAME)),p2.value
share|improve this answer
    
This assumes that p2.value is the same for every step. If each step relates to a different p2.value, this won't work. – MatBailie Nov 23 '12 at 14:07
    
but it shows 0 (zero) at the max(step) even when the max is 3 – Slim Nov 23 '12 at 14:10
    
Try to remove WHERE h.ROLE = 'rock' – Parado Nov 23 '12 at 14:17
    
But I need it to be rock as there are also records for metal – Slim Nov 23 '12 at 14:21
    
Where is column step? In which table ? – Parado Nov 23 '12 at 14:25

To get only one record with the highest step, use

SELECT TOP(1)
......
......
ORDER BY step desc
share|improve this answer
    
What if the OP really does need multiple rows (one row for each REQ_ID,ID for example)? – MatBailie Nov 23 '12 at 14:06
    
In that case, OP would just need to remove step from the GROUP BY clause, like I had posted before and Parado described as well. After re-reading the question I figured that this would be the better answer, but maybe I understood it wrong after all. – GolezTrol Nov 23 '12 at 14:07
    
That only works if (for example) the p2.value is the same for all step values. If each step has a different p2.value, but the op only wants the row with the highest step, such a change doesn't work either. [It requires a join on to a sub query, where the sub query finds the MAX(step), or the use of something like ROW_NUMBER() to find the row with the max step value.] – MatBailie Nov 23 '12 at 14:15
1  
It's just a matter of interpretation of the question. You don't have to convince me why that answer would be wrong, because I'm not even sure it answers the question. That's why I deleted that answer in the first place. I would say your answer is wrong, since it returns a row per group while the OP just asks for "one row". Maybe it would be best if we just close-vote the question. – GolezTrol Nov 23 '12 at 14:19

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